4 Biggest Cybersecurity Threats to SMBs

4 Biggest Cybersecurity Threats to SMBsMany people mistakenly believe that small to mid-sized businesses are less likely to be targeted by cyber criminals. While larger organizations certainly bear the brunt of online attacks, the fact is no business is safe from a potential breach. In fact, nearly half (43 percent) of all cyber-attacks actually target small businesses and 60 percent will go out of business within six months. The best way to defend against these attacks is to prepare for them in advance. Here are the top four cybersecurity threats SMBs face and how to secure against them.

Insider Risk – Believe it or not, the biggest security risk most organizations face is not some unknown hacker, but rather the people who work within the company itself. And in most cases, there is no malice involved, just a lack of clear understanding and knowledge of what to look for. Educating employees on the basics of cybersecurity is critical to thwarting things like phishing and other social engineering scams.

Ransomware – You can’t go anywhere online today without seeing a headline about ransomware. This type of malware essentially infects a user’s computer and locks all data unless and until the victim agrees to pay a ransom fee. Again, educating employees on what types of things might be suspicious and also having automated cybersecurity incident response technology in place that can quickly identify, isolate and eradicate the virus before it has a chance to spread are the keys to proper prevention.

DDoS Attacks – Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks ambush businesses by sending massive amounts of traffic to their websites, slowing them to a crawl and in many cases forcing critical services offline. For companies that rely on their websites or other online services to manage day to day operations, such an outage can cost tens of thousands of dollars in revenue. DDoS attacks can’t be entirely prevented, but having a strategy in place that includes a documented response plan can help mitigate damages.

BYOD – Today’s connected technology has opened many doors of opportunity for businesses to allow employees to bring their own devices (BYOD) and use them in the workplace. Of course, allowing network access with unsecured devices also comes with an added risk of data theft. The solution lies in the development and implementation of a comprehensive BYOD policy which includes educating employees on device expectations and allows businesses to carefully monitor information sharing.

These are just four of the many different vulnerabilities small to midsized businesses face when it comes to cybersecurity. Thankfully, keeping data protected, defending against incoming attacks and recovering quickly following a successful breach is entirely possible. And it doesn’t necessarily have to cost an arm and a leg, either. Check out these five ways to boost your company’s cybersecurity without breaking the bank and download your free trial of Ayehu automated incident response platform today.

How to Get Critical Systems Back Online in Minutes

5 Steps for Responding to a Ransomware Attack

5 Steps for Responding to a Ransomware AttackJust when you thought it was safe to go back to work without worrying about potentially becoming a victim of ransomware, the savvy criminals behind these attacks up their game (ex: WannaCry). The fact is while companies may now be well aware of the risks they are facing hackers continue to stay a step ahead, identifying newer vulnerabilities to exploit and finding more effective strategies for getting what they want. In fact, we often say it’s not so much a matter of if you will be attacked, but rather when.

That’s why having a response and remediation plan in place is so important. The sooner you are able to thwart the attack, the less likely you’ll be to have to pony up the ransom. If you’re not sure where to begin, here are five key steps that can help you bounce back quickly from a ransomware incident.

Prepare – Of course, the first step in developing a strong defense to ransomware should always be prevention, as much as possible. IT personnel should be diligent about patching any known vulnerabilities as soon as they’re discovered and also take the appropriate measures to ensure that any and all additional access routes are effectively contained. Also, routinely back up and safely store all important files.

Detect – Effectively guarding against today’s sophisticated cyber-attacks requires the use of advanced threat intelligence technology. These tools are designed to block breach attempts and also alert the security team of a potential incident so that it can be addressed as quickly as possible. Keep in mind that tools like anti-virus software aren’t always effective in detecting ransomware, particularly attacks that are initiated via social engineering.

Contain – One of the biggest reasons why malware is so harmful is that it can spread throughout a network very quickly, effecting as much damage in as little time as possible. The goal of any good ransomware response strategy should be to isolate and contain the virus before it has a chance to proliferate. This can dramatically reduce the potential damage the virus can inflict.

Eradicate – Once the ransomware virus is detected and contained, the next step is to eradicate it from the network. Any machines affected should either be replaced or thoroughly cleaned and continuously monitored thereafter.

Recover – As mentioned above, it’s critical to regularly back up your files. Once you’ve done so, deleting the infected files and restoring the good ones is easy. Your data remains safe and the criminals leave empty handed. As part of the recovery process, an investigation should be conducted to further identify sources of potential vulnerabilities as well as processes and policies that may need revision in order to prevent future attacks.

When it comes to ransomware and other types of cybersecurity threats, there’s no foolproof way to completely eliminate risk. The best way to protect your organization and prevent significant financial and reputational damage is to invest in the right technology. Automated cybersecurity incident response is designed to help with all five phases of ransomware response above – and all without the need for human intervention.

Keep your company a step ahead of hackers. Download your free 30 day trial of Ayehu today!

How to Get Critical Systems Back Online in Minutes

How to Strengthen Your Cybersecurity Resilience

How to Strengthen Your Cybersecurity ResilienceOrganizations in every industry and across the entire world are deeply entrenched in the battle to prevent a security breach. Thankfully there are specific steps security teams can take that will improve their cybersecurity resilience so they can better manage the barrage of threats that are inevitably going to continue. Let’s take a closer look at what this so-called resilience really is and how you can strengthen yours to improve your ability to manage, mitigate and recover from cyber-attacks.

Cybersecurity Resilience Defined

The Ponemon Institute defines cybersecurity resilience as “the capacity of an enterprise to maintain its core purpose and integrity in the face of cyber-attacks.” More specifically, a company’s cybersecurity resilience can be viewed as the place where prevention, detection and response to cyber incidents align. A resilient organization is one that is capable of preventing, detecting, containing and – most importantly – recovering from various threats against its data, network and IT infrastructure.

Why Cybersecurity Resilience is Critically Important

These days, there is no company that is safe from becoming a victim of a cyber-attack. It’s no longer a question of “if” a security incident will occur, but rather “when.” As such, it’s of critical importance that IT personnel (and, frankly, everyone else within an organization) be well prepared to battle against these inevitable attacks. And as cyber-attacks continue to increase in number and complexity, boasting solid cybersecurity resilience will become more important than ever before.

Bringing Things Together

Unfortunately, the increasing complexity of IT and general business processes has created a new barrier to effective cybersecurity resilience. In fact, according to recent studies, this complexity has become the second largest obstacle to cyber resilience, with insufficient planning and lack of adequate preparedness being first.

One of the main causes of these so-called complexities is the fact that many organizations have a multitude of individual IT and security tools, applications and processes in place, each operating independently. With so many fragmented tools and processes but no actual standardized system to manage it all, these companies are left vulnerable to the risk of cyber-attacks.

What’s needed is a universal platform that leverages advanced automation and orchestration technology to bring everything together, create a unified system and effectively fight fire with fire.

Keys to Improving Cybersecurity Resilience

Improving your organization’s cybersecurity resilience requires buy-in and cooperation from the top down. It’s much more than just getting the approval to invest in the right tool or implementing the appropriate technology. Cybersecurity is everyone’s job, and it starts at the top. To be effective, security must become more than just a topic or something IT handles. It must become ingrained as part of the company’s underlying culture.

Becoming cybersecurity resilient isn’t an easy task. It takes a true effort to bring together the necessary technology with the people at the helm. Provided the executives of the company are committed and the appropriate tools are put in place, the organization will ultimately develop the strength and resiliency it needs to withstand any attack that comes its way.

Ready to leverage technology to strengthen your enterprise’s cybersecurity resiliency? Start today by downloading your free 30 day trial of Ayehu’s automation and orchestration platform.

 

How to Get Critical Systems Back Online in Minutes

What is Machine Learning (AI) and Why Does it Matter?

There’s been a lot of buzz recently about so-called machine learning, yet despite so much talk, there are a great number of individuals who are still unfamiliar with this technology. As IT automation experts, the team at Ayehu is already harnessing the power of this innovative concept in the automation and orchestration solutions we offer. As such, we thought it might be helpful to delve a little bit into what machine learning is and, more importantly, what it can do for your organization.

What is Machine Learning?

Machine learning is a form of artificial intelligence which involves an algorithm that learns a pattern in existing data and then uses that information to predict a similar pattern in new data. Despite the recent attention it has been getting, machine learning is nothing new. But thanks to the overabundance in available data and more affordable tools for gathering, processing, deciphering and storing that data, these algorithms can now easily be applied to produce fast, affordable results for businesses everywhere.

Why does it matter?

From a business standpoint, machine learning can facilitate better decision-making in real-time, without the need for human intervention. Essentially, the technology is intuitive enough to “learn” from past events and adapt for better performance in the future based on that information. By leveraging these precise algorithms, organizations can better identify profitable opportunities and more effectively avoid unknown risks.

Who can benefit the most from Machine Learning?What is Machine Learning (AI) and Why Does it Matter?

Businesses in almost every industry can potentially benefit from machine learning technology, but there are several industries for which this technology is particularly useful. Specifically, organizations in industries that require the handling of large amounts of data are already realizing the benefits of machine learning in gaining insight and competitive advantage.

This type of AI can also be highly effective in the area of information security by automating incident response and using existing data to predict and prevent future cybersecurity risks. As such, the businesses that have already begun leveraging machine learning with great results include those that fall into any of the following sectors:

  • Financial Services
  • Healthcare
  • Government
  • Sales and Marketing
  • Transportation
  • Utilities

Not coincidentally, each of these industries also happens to be at a greater risk of a cyber-attack due to the sensitive nature of the information and data they handle on a day to day basis. Machine learning can help manage, store and utilize the available data to streamline operations and improve customer experience. It can also help build a stronger defense against potential security breaches by providing round-the-clock monitoring and automated response for faster, more effective remediation.

How Ayehu is Using Machine Learning

The next generation of Ayehu is a simple yet powerful web-based automation and orchestration platform for IT and security operations that leverages proprietary, sophisticated machine learning algorithms to provide decision support via suggestions to optimize workflows and dynamically create rule-based recommendations, insights and correlations. Agentless and codeless, Ayehu is easily deployed, allowing users to rapidly automate tasks and processes, including interoperability across multiple, disparate solutions and systems from one, standalone platform.

To see machine learning technology in action, click here to request a free demo.

How to Get Critical Systems Back Online in Minutes

Who are Cyber Criminals Targeting and How?

Who are Cyber Criminals Targeting and How?Verizon recently released its annual Data Breach Investigations Report, a comprehensive resource that is based on analysis of over 40,000 incidents, including 1,935 confirmed data breaches. As one might imagine, with this much data, the report itself can be somewhat overwhelming. We thought it would be helpful to summarize what we feel is one of the most critical messages, at least from a cybersecurity in business perspective. That is – defining who is most likely to be targeted by cyber criminals and what tactics they’re using to achieve their malicious goals. Here’s what you need to know.

Who are the most common victims of cybersecurity attacks?

The Verizon report uncovered that the industries most frequently targeted by hackers were as follows:

  • 24% of breaches affected financial organizations
  • 15% of breaches involved healthcare organizations
  • 12% Public sector entities
  • 15% Retail and Accommodation combined

It’s pretty obvious why cyber criminals would target financial and healthcare institutions, since these organizations deal very heavily in confidential information. Not surprisingly, the report found that 73% of breaches were financially motivated. Public sector is a rather interesting area, though some of this could be related to hacktivism, a type of cyber-crime that’s been steadily on the rise. Retail and other types of accommodation organizations also handle a good deal of customer data, particularly as it relates to financial and personal identification material.

What methods are cyber-attackers using?

There are a wide variety of techniques a cyber-criminal might use to access the information he or she is after. According to the report, here are the most common:

  • 62% of breaches featured hacking (81% of hacking-related breaches leveraged either stolen and/or weak passwords)
  • 51% over half of breaches included malware
  • 43% were social attacks
  • 14% were due to errors
  • 14% as a result of privilege misuse
  • 8% were caused by physical actions

The truly alarming fact here is that hacking can come in many different forms. There are basic hacks and then there are those orchestrated by highly sophisticated cyber criminals. These are more commonly referred to as Advanced Persistent Threats, or APTs. In these instances, the actors behind the attacks are absolutely relentless. They also strategically target their victims to increase the odds of achieving the end result they’re after.

It should also be noted that the number of social engineering attacks is also on the rise. This can be tied into malware, as techniques like phishing scams typically involve the deployment of some type of malicious code. In fact, the report also found that 66% of malware was installed via malicious email attachments.

What you need to know…

The most important thing we’d like to point out is that even those organizations that fall outside the main categories of cybersecurity targets should operate under the assumption and expectation that they will likely also become a victim at some point. In other words, no company is safe. Small businesses to enterprise level, and organizations in every industry across the globe are all at risk of becoming a target of cyber-criminals.

The best way to defend against these threats is to leverage the power of technology that is available to you. Remember – attacks are coming in at an alarming rate and increasing in both volume and complexity. Likewise, tools like anti-virus software and firewalls are no match for sophisticated social engineering campaigns. A combination of employee education and automated cybersecurity incident response can provide an extra barrier of protection. It can also help with the most important step – remediation – getting critical systems back up and running quickly and mitigating damages.

Want to avoid becoming a part of the disturbing statistics listed above? Arm your company with the right technology. Launch your free 30 day trial of eyeShare and start beefing up your protection today.

 

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

What is ‘WannaCry’ Ransomware and How Can You Keep Your Organization Safe?

What is ‘WannaCry’ and How Can You Keep Your Organization Safe?If you haven’t yet heard, there’s a new kind of ransomware and it’s wreaking havoc across the globe. It’s appropriately called ‘WannaCry,’ and it has thus far claimed some 350,000 victims in over 150 countries worldwide. As these numbers appear to be on the rise, IT professionals everywhere are taking notice, attempting to head the virus-spreading malware off at the pass before they become part of the statistic. Here’s what you need to know in order to keep your organization secure.

What is WannaCry?

WannaCry is a unique form of ransomware which uses a flaw in Microsoft software to deploy a malicious virus. Given the widespread popularity of Windows, it’s not surprising that once the vulnerability was exploited, it spread rapidly across many networks, affecting organizations in almost every industry. The fact that the vulnerability was so broadly available and the ability to spread quickly without human intervention created the ideal environment in which the “worm” could flourish.

Once deployed, the Wanna Decryptor program locks all of the data on a computer system and leaves the user with only two remaining files: the WannaCry program and instructions on what to do next. Infected users are given a few days to pay the proposed ransom or risk permanent deletion of their files. A Bitcoin address is provided to which the user is advised they must pay up in order to release their data from the malware.

How can organizations protect themselves?

While most organizations have virus protection in place that is supposed to protect against ransomware, the fact that this particular strain was able to bypass so many existing protective measures to affect hundreds of organizations across the globe, including the United Kingdom’s National Health Service and Telefonica in Spain. In other words, despite some of the most sophisticated defense mechanisms, many well-known enterprises were unable to prevent the virus.

As with any other type of cyber-attack, the best defense against WannaCry is a good offense. As hundreds of IT professionals are scrambling to pick up the pieces and recover from this most recent attack, it’s become even more evident that preventing threats is simply not always possible. The key then is to be able to respond as quickly as possible to mitigate damages, something that can’t be effectively accomplished without the help of machine technology – that is, automation.

A Secret Weapon…

Rapid automated response remediates devices affected by the WannaCry virus, then blocks the ransomware’s lateral and upward propagation, thereby protecting the entire enterprise network. Suspected ransomware attempts will immediately trigger a playbook to automatically initiate remediation and mitigation procedures.

Additionally, thanks to machine learning capabilities, the automated tool can initiate security controls, build indicators of compromise and implement them on the network infrastructure. This will facilitate faster identification of existing infections as well as helping to block future ones from occurring in the first place.

The WannaCry ransomware outbreak serves as an important reminder that no organization is safe from the risk of a cyber-attack. Its massive success also reminds us that despite our most valiant efforts, preventing such an attack is simply not always possible. As such, having the right orchestration and automation platform in place to quickly pinpoint, isolate and eradicate the problem is key.

Want to give your enterprise this added level of protection? Launch your free trial of eyeShare today.

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

C-Suite Priorities: Protecting against ransomware with cyber security incident response

C-Suite Priorities: Protecting against ransomware with cyber security incident response

This article was originally published as a guest post on the Cyber Security Buzz blog.

Security executives are under increasing pressure to keep sensitive networks, systems and data safe from threats which are rapidly increasing in both frequency as well as complexity. It’s no surprise, then, that CSOs and CISOs often find themselves in the hot seat when it comes to the topic of cyber security. Their roles are changing along with the new daily challenges they face, and as such, they are working tirelessly to remain abreast of the latest cyber-threat news.

In particular, with ransomware steadily on the rise and cyber criminals developing new and improved ways to expose and exploit vulnerabilities, IT leaders have no choice but to re-examine their cyber security strategies to ensure that they are strong enough to withstand the variety of incoming threats they face. By investing in an incident response plan as the first line of defense, executives can provide the added protection of instant identification and isolation of the threat before it has a chance to wreak havoc.

The fact is, as the landscape of cyber threats continues to evolve and expand, it’s becoming abundantly clear that traditional preventative approaches to network and data security are no longer effective. In fact, even Gartner believes that detection and response are the foundation of a successful cyber security strategy. No organization is immune to potential attack and without the ability to quickly pinpoint and remediate a successful breach, the outcome could be nothing short of devastating, both from a financial as well as a reputational standpoint.

Compounding the problem is the increasingly widespread adoption of cloud technology and the IoT. Simply put, migration to the cloud fundamentally changes IT security. In a cloud or hybrid environment, the focus must shift to monitoring and managing incident response. Likewise, with more and more connected devices being incorporated into the workplace, the risk of potentially becoming a victim of a ransomware attack increases exponentially. Now, instead of a few vulnerabilities, the office becomes a potential gold mine for hackers, which means much more work for security professionals.

What’s the solution? While preventative measures, such as firewalls and malware monitors have their place, the best defense an organization can take against security breaches is a more robust incident response strategy that covers all bases. Specifically, a system that integrates with, enhances and extends the capabilities of existing systems and applications to create a more holistic, streamlined and highly-effective process.

A strong cyber security incident response strategy should be able to not only detect the signs of ransomware, but automatically analyze, isolate and contain the threat so that it cannot cause any additional damage. The isolated virus can then be eradicated and the recovery process can automatically begin, effectively mitigating damages. This type of approach essentially closes the loop, creating a much more impervious defense against cyber-attacks, regardless of when, where and how many points of entry exist. Best of all, this can be handled entirely without the need for human input, solving the staffing shortage and addressing skills gap in one fell swoop.

With the worldwide expenditure on enhancing detection and response capabilities expected to be a key priority for security buyers through 2020, the time for security executives to begin shifting their focus is now. By investing in a robust, automated cyber security incident response plan as the first line of defense, executives can provide their organizations the added level of protection they need to effectively thwart would-be attackers and manage threats in a way that will limit damages as much as possible.

To read the original published article, please click here.

How to Get Critical Systems Back Online in Minutes

5 Ways to Strengthen Your Organization’s Cybersecurity Risk Posture

5 Ways to Strengthen Your Organization’s Cybersecurity Risk PostureA company’s risk posture refers to its overarching cybersecurity plan – that is, its approach to keeping sensitive data safe from internal and external threats. This includes everything from proactive planning and prevention to implementation, management and remediation strategy. No company – large or small – is immune to a potential security breach, which means every single organization in business today should develop and maintain a strong, comprehensive risk posture. Could your strategy use a little help?

Here are five simple ways you can beef up your protection and improve where your company stands against cyber threats.

Lead by Example – Business owners and managers must take the topic of cybersecurity very serious if they want frontline employees to follow suit. The fact is, keeping data safe is everyone’s job, but leading by example is an important way to ensure that everyone across the board views security as the top priority it truly is.

Invest in Education – When we discuss the topic of cybersecurity, the vision most often conjured up is that of a sophisticated hacker, but in reality, internal parties are often the greatest risk to a company’s data security. That’s why it’s so important to invest in ongoing training to ensure that all employees understand how to keep information safe, how to spot and avoid potential incidents and what their role is in the company’s overall approach.

Close the Loop – One of the biggest problems with many companies’ risk postures today is that they are incomplete. That is, they may have invested heavily into monitoring, but have forgotten the other side of the coin, which is response and remediation. Much of the damage from a successful breach comes in the time it takes to identify and resolve the problem. Technology, like automated cybersecurity incident response, ensures you cover all your bases, reducing resolution time and mitigating damages.

Learn from the Past – A great indicator of future events is what has happened in the past. Successful breaches can become valuable learning tools to help identify and address vulnerabilities and develop stronger security practices for the future.

Test and Optimize – Cybersecurity is not a ‘set it and forget it’ task. Hackers and other sophisticated criminals are constantly honing their craft and leveraging newer and better tools and technology to achieve their unsavory goals. The only way to keep up is to adopt an agile approach to security. Testing analyzing and implementing improvements on an ongoing basis will make you better armed to go toe-to-toe with would be attackers.

Is your risk posture strong enough to prevent potentially devastating losses? If not, the time to take action is now. To try Ayehu’s cybersecurity automation platform FREE for 30 days, simply click here.

 

How to Get Critical Systems Back Online in Minutes

Manual Incident Management vs. Orchestrated Incident Management – A Tale of Two Processes

Manual Incident Management vs. Orchestrated Incident Management – A Tale of Two Processes

 

Recently we shared a blog post that explored what orchestration, how it can be used and several of the many existing business benefits. Today, we thought it might be helpful to dig even deeper and provide a real-life scenario to demonstrate the vast difference between manual and orchestrated incident management. So, without further ado, let us present to you: a tale of two processes.


Manual Incident Management

Meet Manual Joe, an IT administrator who is tasked with keeping the sensitive information of his employer secure from potential breaches. Unfortunately, Joe is buried under a sea of manual tasks, processes and workflows.

Whenever an incident occurs, it almost always means a stressful afternoon for Joe and his team. First, they receive an alert letting them know something is wrong. A hard drive has failed. A system or portion of the network isn’t functioning properly. The website isn’t responding. The list goes on and on.

Manual Joe and his team respond to these alerts by implementing a series of documented manual processes. As the day goes on, Joe’s team has to spend hours of their time hammering out these tasks and monitoring their progress. They constantly have to log in and out of various systems and leverage different tools in order to perform their job duties. It’s a huge drag.

When they are able to resolve an event, they’re elated. Unfortunately, this doesn’t happen nearly as often as it should. Instead, Joe and his team find themselves running in circles, chasing their tails and frequently wasting precious time and resources on things like false positives. Complex issues often have to be escalated to senior level agents, which results in frequent delays and a whole lot of frustration.

Meanwhile, because they are overworked and mere mortals, keeping up with the volume of incidents is becoming an exercise in futility. As a result, critical events are allowed to slip by undetected until it’s too late. In some cases, the entire organization suffers as a result.

Perhaps what frustrates Joe and his team members the most, however, is that they are all extremely talented individuals who bring a lot of value to the table. But since the vast majority of their time is spent putting out fires and carrying out repetitive, mundane tasks, those skills and talents go unused. Not only is this affecting the morale of the IT department, but the business is also missing out on the opportunity to achieve greater performance through IT innovation.

This is the life of Manual Joe and his team, day after day after painful day.


Orchestrated Incident Management                                                                                                                  

Down the street, there’s another organization where Orchestration Jane is employed. She too is an IT administrator, but unlike Joe, her company has invested in a powerful orchestration and automation platform which she and her team use to their fullest advantage.

With orchestrated incident management, Jane is able to automatically remediate the vast majority of all incoming alerts and incidents. In most cases, neither she nor her team needs to get involved in the process at all.

In an orchestrated environment, when an incident occurs, the platform automatically identifies it and implements the appropriate course of action to resolve the issue. The orchestration tool can handle every step of the process, from opening an incident ticket to keeping that ticket updated on steps taken or progress made. Once the incident is effectively resolved, the orchestration tool then updates and closes the ticket. All of this is done without any manual effort from Jane or her team.

In instances for which automated remediation cannot be achieved, the escalation process is also carried out by the orchestration platform. The appropriate individuals receive notification and can respond remotely via a number of different methods, including email or SMS text. If the initial contact does not respond in a timely manner, the next appropriate individual will be notified, and so forth. This eliminates costly and frustrating delays.

Jane and her team particularly appreciate the fact that with orchestrated incident response, there’s no need to write, deploy or maintain scripts. Instead, the platform seamlessly integrates and coordinates actions across multiple systems, servers and tools. This is a huge savings of time for the IT department.

In addition to incident response, the orchestration and automation platform Jane’s company uses also allows her to proactively schedule and execute maintenance tasks. This helps to keep the infrastructure functioning better and reduces the number of alerts that will ultimately occur.

Finally, because Jane and her team isn’t bogged down by time-consuming manual tasks, processes and workflows, they are able to focus their attention and apply their skills to higher-level projects, such as those involving planning, innovation and growth. As a result, Orchestration Jane and the rest of her crew look forward to going to work every day because they know their abilities are being put to good use.


The fact is, each of these scenarios is being played out in IT departments across the globe and in just about every industry. If you can relate more to Joe than Jane, it’s time to make a change in the right direction. Start your free trial of Ayehu orchestration and automation platform and experience for yourself what an incredible different orchestrated incident management truly can make for your organization.

Be like Jane. Download your free trial today!

Managing Cybersecurity in a Multi-Generational Workplace

While Millennials are slowly but surely beginning to take over the workplace, there are still plenty of workers from older generations infiltrating modern offices across the globe. In fact, many of the higher-up positions, such as c-suite executive roles, are currently held by individuals from Gen-X and even a few Baby Boomers still hanging on. Likewise, generation Z will slowly begin to make their way into the workforce over the coming years.

Managing operations across multiple generations can be difficult in and of itself, and the topic of cybersecurity is no exception. It’s especially challenging given the fact that each group of workers has their own experience, beliefs and opinions surrounding how to keep data secure. If your organization happens to be home to a diverse age range of employees, here are a few tips for making cybersecurity something everyone can universally maintain.

Bridging the Gap

One of the biggest issues with developing a multi-generational cybersecurity policy is the different experiences each group brings to the table. For instance, while it may be easy to incorporate security training into the new employee onboarding process, getting older workers – particularly those who are less tech-savvy – on board and supportive of cybersecurity initiatives isn’t always so easy. As a result, different types of training and educational programs might be needed based on each demographic.

A Glaring IssueManaging Cybersecurity in a Multi-Generational Workplace

To further illustrate the challenge security professionals face when dealing with a workforce from various age groups, a joint study was conducted by Citrix and the Ponemon Institute, which revealed the following:

  • 55% of respondents said that Millennials (born between 1981 and 1997) pose the greatest risk of circumventing IT security policies and use of unapproved apps in the workplace.
  • 33% said Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) are the most susceptible to phishing and social engineering scams.
  • 30% said Gen Xers (born from 1965 to 1980) were most likely to exhibit carelessness in following an organization’s security policies.

Each of these eye-opening facts must be taken into account when developing cybersecurity training and implementing organizational policies.

Tapping into Technology

Another great way to help bring different generations together to support the common goal of enhanced cybersecurity is to leverage as much technology as possible. For instance, by deploying monitoring software and integrating it with an automation and orchestration platform for enhanced incident response, technology can do much of the heavy lifting, alleviating the burden on human workers. This can help reluctant individuals to view the importance of security in a more positive light.

Universal Education is Key

It’s important to point out that while each generation may have its own mindset about security issues, there are also certain universal truths that should be taught regardless of age group. Keep in mind that hackers rarely know precisely who they are targeting. Their goal is to simply achieve their end result as quickly and easily as possible, regardless of who might be on the receiving end. Likewise, it’s important not to assume that an employee is inherently aware that they are putting the organization at risk simply because he or she is from a particular generation. As such, universal education must be a priority.

Communicate Clearly and Often

As a more tech-savvy generation makes its way into the workplace, security professionals will have the additional challenge of bringing new employees up to speed and ensuring that they fully comprehend the implications of keeping sensitive data secure. While these younger workers may be more comfortable with technology, it doesn’t necessarily mean they have a realistic understanding of how to protect the information they’re accessing and sharing. Expectations should be clearly communicated early and often to ensure optimum compliance.

What challenges has your organization had to deal with in terms of maintaining maximum cybersecurity across multiple generations of workers? Please share in the comments below!

 

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response