3 Challenges Every SOC Struggles With (and How to Overcome Them)

In the cybersecurity realm, security operations centers (SOCs) are under increasing pressure to not only be proactive about protecting networks and the sensitive data contained within, but in many cases, they are expected to be predictive. This is coupled with the demand to provide 24/7 protection. All of this requires that SOC leaders learn from, understand and remain a step ahead of would-be attackers. That being said, there are certain challenges that just about every SOC is plagued by. Here are three such obstacles and how to effectively overcome them with SOC automation.

Resource Allocation

One of the biggest issues SOC leaders face today is centered on staffing, or the lack of qualified personnel. Are there enough people on staff? Do they have the right skills for the job? What happens if and when someone leaves? While some organizations choose to solve this problem with outsourcing, there is then the compounded issue of greater vulnerability that comes with remote work environments.

3 Challenges Every SOC Struggles With (and How to Overcome Them)These resource constraints don’t have to be crippling to productivity or even growth, provided the right technology is in place. For instance, SOC automation can provide continuous monitoring as well as rapid response and resolution with little to no human intervention required. Such a setup enables even the smallest of teams to run efficient, highly effective and profitable operations.

Information Overload

There has been a noticeable shift over the last decade or so through which security operation centers have gone from intelligence scarcity to experiencing what can only be referred to as information overload. Today, SOC operators are challenged with sifting through mountains of data – from emails and reports to files and alerts – with a goal of extracting the information they need and leveraging that data to effectively thwart potential cybersecurity incidents.

To combat this challenge, it is recommended that SOC leaders focus on obtaining information from known and trusted sources, thereby narrowing volume and eliminating unnecessary noise. From there, they should prioritize and address the data that is deemed to be relevant to their particular environments. Furthermore, SOC automation can be utilized for better threat management and help avoid alert fatigue.

Data Integrity & Intelligence Management

Last, but certainly not least there is the challenge of standardization for the purpose of effective information sharing. Now that the cybersecurity domain has become a place where intelligence transfer is commonplace, there is a new struggle that involves determining and agreeing upon a set of standards for how that intelligence is classified, validated, communicated and, of course, protected.

To address this, the first step revolves around the development and adoption of common naming conventions and common indicator formats. For instance, naming identified APTs, malware and viruses. From there, creating and maintaining a database of past attacks and attackers is recommended in order to develop a set of best practices. This requires more of a focus on building a predictive and actionable defense rather than reactively putting out fires as they occur. Once again, SOC automation fits right into this strategy by providing the tools necessary to easily track, monitor and report cybersecurity data.

Is your SOC struggling with one or more of these common challenges? If so, automation could be the key to getting things back on the right track. Download your free trial of our innovative SOC automation platform today!





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The True Cost of Network Downtime

The True Cost of Network DowntimeA recent report published by IDC and sponsored by AppDynamics reveals the actual costs associated with network downtime and infrastructure failure. The results are pretty compelling. For a Fortune 1000 company:

  • The average cost of a critical application is between $500k and $1 million per hour
  • The average cost of an infrastructure failure is $100k per hour
  • The average annual total cost of unplanned downtime is between $1.25 billion and $2.5 billion

Obviously these numbers will vary depending on the size of the organization, but regardless, they’re pretty eye opening.

The survey also provided some valuable insight into adoption of DevOps tools. As it turns out, nearly half (43 percent) of respondents said they were already employing DevOps while 40 percent have a plan in place to do so in the near future. Yet, despite these relatively positive numbers, the survey also revealed some of the common obstacles to DevOps adoption, and they’re nothing we haven’t seen time and time again.

  • 7% Cultural inhibitors
  • 3% Fragmented processes
  • 7% Lack of executive support

Another intriguing trend the study uncovered references organizations that try to use their existing tool sets to create a make-shift DevOps environment. For these companies, there is a pretty hefty fail rate (somewhere around 80 percent), making it abundantly clear that in order to be successful in adopting DevOps, the appropriate tools and applications are needed. For those organizations doing the right thing (or those that intend to), the biggest initiatives driving those decisions include:

  • IT process automation 60%
  • Continuous delivery 50%
  • Continuous integration 43.3%
  • Automated testing 43.3%
  • Application monitoring/management 43.3%

For us, the key takeaways of this report both lead back to the fact that IT process automation is becoming a mainstream component of IT departments across the board. Not only does it provide a solution to reducing network downtime and thereby mitigating the astronomical costs associated with that downtime, but it’s also the major driving force behind successful DevOps adoption and implementation.

Regardless of whether your company runs the risk of losses as big as those projected above, or you’re (thankfully) on a much smaller scale, outages can and will impact your bottom line. Implementing the right tools, including ITPA and automated cyber security incident response, can help lower this risk significantly. It will also facilitate a more efficient, productive and streamlined DevOps environment in which all parts work together in tandem for the greater good of the organization.

As always, we recommend taking any survey numbers (even those from reputable sources such as this) with a certain grain of salt. We also recommend arming yourself with the one weapon that can combat both issues discussed here: IT process automation. You can get started right now by simply clicking here and downloading a free trial. Don’t end up on the wrong end of the statistics. Start automating today.



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7 Ways to Spot a Phishing Scam

7 Ways to Spot a Phishing ScamDid you know that upwards of 85 percent of all organizations today have been victims of some type of phishing attack? And with the average cost of a successful phishing scam ringing in at around $1.6 million, the problem is very real. What’s more, it’s not just everyday employees being targeted. In fact, 1 in 3 companies are routinely attacked in the form of CEO fraud emails.

These statistics should bring to light the critical importance of protecting your organization – regardless of size or industry – against potential malware attacks, and as always, the best defense is a good offense. To prevent your employees (particularly those in the C-suite) from being bested by a hacker, here are things to train them to watch for.

 

Poor Grammar and/or Spelling – One of the first clues that a particular message might have been sent with malicious intent is the quality of the content within. While most monitoring programs successfully filter out most harmful emails, some will inevitably sneak by. A message from an unknown sender containing poor grammar, misspelled words or content that isn’t logical should raise some red flags.

Mismatched URLs – The goal of a phishing campaign is to give the appearance of authenticity in order to convince the recipient that it’s ok to open an attachment or click on an embedded link. In the latter, the URL may look completely legitimate when, in fact, it actually redirects to a malicious site. To avoid this, all employees should be encouraged to hover over URLs to verify that the actual hyperlink matches.

Misleading Domain Names – Another trick many hackers use in phishing scams is to use misleading domain names to make unsuspecting recipients believe a URL is trustworthy. This can easily be identified by how the URL is laid out. For instance, a phishing artist may attempt to trick a victim by creating a child domain with a familiar name, such as Apple and then linking it to a malicious site. The result might be something like: Apple.malicousdomainname.com. Educating employees on how DNS naming structure works can help quickly detect and address any potential fraudulent messages before they are successful.

Requests for Personal Information – Regardless of how official an email may appear, if the message contained within requests personal information, proceed with extreme caution. Remind employees to always take a step back and assess the logic of these types of messages. Banks or credit card companies don’t need customers to provide their account numbers. Likewise, reputable senders will never ask for things like passwords, credit card numbers of anything else that’s confidential in nature.

Unsolicited Contact – If receiving an email filled with lofty promises seems too good to be true, it probably is. Furthermore, if you didn’t do anything to initiate the contact in the first place, it’s almost certainly going to be some type of scam. Any such message should always be regarded with suspicion and great caution.

Messages Containing Threats – While most phishing campaigns lure victims with the promise of enrichment, some hackers resort instead to rely on intimidation tactics to scare recipients into giving up sensitive information. For instance, an email like this might appear to be from a trusted and respected sender, such as a bank or the IRS, and it might contain a message threatening account closure or asset seizure if money or personal information isn’t provided. These types of intimidating messages should raise a red flag.

Something Just Doesn’t Look Right – Last, but certainly not least, intuition can often be enough to flag a potentially harmful email. Teach employees that if they receive a message that gives them pause, for whatever reason, they should trust their gut and escalate it accordingly. After all, it’s always better to be safe than sorry.

Are you doing enough to protect your organization against phishing and other malicious campaigns? Educate your employees on what red flags to watch for and remind them to never click on a link or open an attachment from an unknown or suspicious sender. Then, fortify your cybersecurity incident response strategy with automation.

Click here to start your free 30 day trial today and get the peace of mind you deserve.





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Creating an Effective Cybersecurity Incident Response Plan

There are two common reasons why many organizations today are still failing to properly prepare for possible cyber-attacks. Some companies erroneously believe that the cybersecurity incident response plan they already have in place is sufficient enough to handle threats, while others mistakenly believe they are not at risk of such an attack at all. But given all the recent high-profile breaches, it’s more evident now than ever before that every business must prepare for the inevitable because everyone is at risk. That said, here are a few tips for establishing a highly effective cybersecurity incident response plan that will keep your organization protected from would-be online attacks.

Creating an Effective Cybersecurity Incident Response PlanFirst, you must evaluate and test your existing incident response protocol to determine its current state and identify areas of potential vulnerability. It’s important to not only have a strategy in place but to also check it regularly to ensure that it’s working as it should be. Simulation exercises and penetration tests should be conducted on a regular basis, not only to assess the quality of the IR plan, but to keep personnel prepared for what steps are necessary to address legitimate threats and, if needed, bring systems back online quickly.

An analysis of existing strategies should also include a check of whether the right tools are being leveraged to simplify, consolidate and streamline the overall cybersecurity incident response process. One of the most common issues behind successful security breaches is the fact that IT personnel simply do not have the bandwidth to effectively field the volume of incoming threats. This is how incidents slip in under the radar and wreak havoc. Adding automation into the process can eliminate this problem by allowing technology to identify, validate and prioritize all incoming threats.

Whether your organization happens to have a plan in place that is inadequate or you’ve not yet taken any measures to develop such a plan, the key is first recognizing the risk and ensuring that your systems and strategies are fully tested and properly planned. Additionally, personnel must be brought up to speed and well-versed in situational response. The hurdles of cost and lack of resources can easily be overcome by employing cost-conscious solutions, like integrating an ITPA tool with existing systems to enhance and extend their effectiveness. A combination of advanced, intuitive technology and adequate staff training should do the trick.

The fact is, cyber-attacks can happen at any time and to any business in any industry. How quickly and fully your organization is able to recover from such an attack is directly proportionate to the quality of the cybersecurity incident response plan you have in place. By applying the principles outlined above, you can proactively manage incoming threats and handle incidents in a timely manner, thereby keeping your company’s sensitive data safe from imminent harm and minimizing downtime as much as possible.

Is your cybersecurity incident response plan strong enough to keep your network secure? Could the added benefit of automation improve and enhance its effectiveness? More importantly, can your organization afford to remain vulnerable to dangerous and costly cyber-attacks? Give our IT process automation and orchestration platform a try free for 30 days and start protecting your business today.



eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response




New Cybersecurity Regulation Takes Effect this Month

New Cybersecurity Regulation Takes Effect this MonthThe state of NY has officially instituted a new cybersecurity regulation that officially takes effect as of today, March 1st, 2017. This somewhat controversial new regulation imposes more detailed rules on those in the banking and insurance industries with the goal of protecting consumers and institutions alike against cyber-attacks.

This is the first regulation of its kind to be adopted by a US state, though trends certainly indicate that others will likely follow suit due to continued frustration and concern with data breaches. Among other things, the law mandates that financial and insurance institutions must officially employ a CISO, implement multifactor authentication policies and that all cybersecurity incidents must be reported within 72 hours.

“New York is the financial capital of the world, and it is critical that we do everything in our power to protect consumers and our financial system from the ever increasing threat of cyberattacks.” ~ New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo

In reality, many of the requirements in the NY regulation have already been implemented by larger financial institutions. For instance, the law requires that organizations:

  • Develop comprehensive cybersecurity programs which include written policies that address such important factors as
    • Access controls
    • Asset inventory
    • Data governance
    • Business continuity
  • Perform periodic risk assessments and yearly penetration tests
  • Use encryption must for all data – both in transit and at rest
  • Establish a written incident response plan

Additionally, the regulation states that CISOs must send annual reports to the board of directors. These things are already common practice for many institutions, so there won’t be much change for them.

“It’s one of the most comprehensive cybersecurity regulations in the financial sector.” ~ Luke Dembosky, former cybercrime prosecutor with the US Justice Department.

All organizations in the state of NY are required to submit a statement to the Superintendent of Financial Services by the 15th of February every year certifying compliance. Although the new regulation technically takes effect on March 1, all institutions affected by the policy have an additional 180 days to comply. Some built-in grace periods within the regulation provide up to two years to come into compliance with certain provisions. Additionally, smaller institutions may apply for exemptions.

Some of the details of this new regulation may be challenging to implement, particularly for smaller organizations with limited resources. Utilizing automated cybersecurity incident response may be the key to getting and staying compliant.

Three Key Takeaways from the 2017 RSA Conference

RSA Conference 2017Last week marked the ever-expanding annual RSA Conference in San Francisco. Over 40,000 cybersecurity professionals came together to share stories and learn about the latest technology to stop hackers and cyber-criminals from getting their hands on an organizations’ crown jewels. From deception solutions to cloud security, the 2017 conference lived up to the hype. We even introduced our next generation automation and orchestration platform, with machine learning intelligence.

Here are three key takeaways from the 2017 RSA Conference.

Takeaway 1: The cybersecurity skills shortage struggle is real…

You’ve all heard the news of the impending cybersecurity skills shortage to the tune of 1.8 million open positions by 2022 and you may have thought it was just sensationalizing or an exaggeration, but you’d be wrong. Time and again we spoke with security professionals at our booth about how they don’t have the resources to be truly effective. A couple people mentioned the volume of incidents in their SOC are increasing as was their concern about not wanting to be the next headline-making organization because they missed an indication of breach or malware taking hold.

Many of the attendees we talked with who stopped by our booth wanted to learn about security automation and orchestration as a practical alternative to the cybersecurity skills shortage. Given the advancements in machine learning technology and growing acceptance of human-augmented decision support (or a human in the loop), cybersecurity incident response automation is emerging as a viable option for SOC teams at both enterprises and MSSPs.

Takeaway 2: An extensible cybersecurity platform is a must-have…

One of the most interesting themes from attendees we talked with was about needing an extensible platform. Gone are the days of a security product simply having the capability to work with other security tools and systems. Now, security professionals – from the top down to the end-users – need a platform that is fully integrated with the multiple, disparate tools leveraged to defend their organization against attacks from malware, ransomware, antivirus, malicious outsiders/insiders, endpoint protection, and the list goes on.

Attendees simply expected any platform on the market today to be integration ready out-of-the-box. Further, with the proliferation of cloud applications and organizations building in-house applications, the platform’s APIs should enable custom extensibility.

Takeaway 3: Semi-automated workflows are in high demand…

The concept of automated incident response is not new in the cybersecurity space. When the first generation security automation tools made it to market 20+ years ago, the maturity level of the technology was at a minimum. Horror stories abound of the inability of the then “state-of-the-art” technology to effectively decipher between legitimate alerts and false positives. Instead, every alert was deemed a real threat. The added inability to selectively shutdown infrastructure components involved in an incident only exacerbated the situation, dooming early hopes that security automation was viable. As you can imagine, or maybe even experienced first-hand, chaos ensued and the technology was abandoned.

Fast-forward to the 2017 RSA Conference and, having learned from past mistakes, a new chapter on security automation has begun. The automated cybersecurity incident response conversations at our booth focused on semi-automated workflow capabilities, where a human is in the loop (read: in control) at all times making decisions. Given the aforementioned cybersecurity skills shortage, semi-automation frees up significant time from dealing with increasing volumes of manual, error-prone tasks and helps to greatly reduce (and even possibly eliminate) false positives, allowing the operations team to focus on true security threats.

All in all, the 2017 RSA Conference lived up to the hype as the most talked about and most attended security conference of the year. We’re already making plans for the 2018 conference and can’t wait to talk cybersecurity incident response automation and orchestration throughout the coming year.

Follow us on Twitter and LinkedIn for the latest news and updates on other events we will be attending and/or presenting at. And, to learn more about the benefits of automating cybersecurity incident response, check out our free eBook below.



eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response




The Rise of SOC Automation

The Rise of SOC AutomationSecurity operation centers (SOC for short) are cropping up in organizations around the globe and across just about every industry. Many large enterprises have already initiated their own SOCs while others are currently in the process. Smaller companies are turning to external resources for their security needs. In either case, the SOC function serves to consolidate and centralize the incident prevention, detection and response process as well as monitoring, vulnerability management and several other key functions. Along with the wider-spread adoption of these teams has also been a steady rise in the use of SOC automation.

The reason why SOC automation is gaining in popularity is multifaceted. Firstly, there is the very real challenge associated with the highly-tailored and extreme complexity of today’s modern cybersecurity attacks. Gone are the days when incoming threats could easily be identified and thwarted with little to no impact on the organization or its sensitive data. Today’s hackers are leveraging newer and better technology to initiate highly targeted and relentless attacks on their victims. Human security teams are simply no match for these advanced persistent threats.

SOC automation facilitates a much more streamlined and highly effective defense against APTs and other such incidents. These platforms serve as an ever-vigilant, well-equipped army that stands at the ready, round-the-clock, to detect and address potential breaches. When an alert is created, it is automatically assessed and either remediated electronically or escalated to the appropriate human party for immediate attention. In other words, SOC automation acts as a force multiplier, enhancing the monitoring function and creating a closed-loop process that is much stronger.

The second area in which SOC automation is helping security teams, both internal and external, do their jobs more effectively is the amount of time it takes to address and resolve successful attacks. Despite our most valiant efforts, there will almost always be some vulnerability through which cyber-criminals can achieve their goals. The amount of damage they are able to do, however, will ultimately depend on how quickly they can be identified and stopped. Obviously, the sooner a breach can be identified and dealt with accordingly, the more the organization can mitigate damages.

In this dynamic, demanding and critical environment, there is little room for error. SOC automation and orchestration tools are virtually transforming these departments into advanced command and control centers by integrating with Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) systems and providing work­flows and play-books that extend SIEM existing capabilities. Agent-less architecture allows for the execution of tasks over physical, virtual, and cloud environments via standard protocols to speed up security incident response and resolution while improving security operations efficiency.

Finally, SOC automation cuts the Mean Time to Resolution and eliminates manual, repetitive tasks by automating incident response playbooks, freeing up scarce manpower resources, and measurably improving service levels. This type of platform also enables the advanced scheduling of security procedures on a regular basis in order to identify and prevent security vulnerabilities. In other words, it allows you to cover all your bases – from prevention and detection to response and remediation. The result is a much more secure, efficient environment overall, which benefits everyone.

To learn more about SOC automation click here. Or, better yet, try it yourself with our free 30 day, no obligation trial.





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Top Cybersecurity Challenges (and How Automation is the Key)

Top Cybersecurity Challenges (and How Automation is the Key)Research conducted by ESG revealed that an incredible 91 percent of IT professionals believe that effective incident response is hindered by the time and effort of manual processes. Furthermore, a full 97 percent of those surveyed either have already or plan on taking steps to automate and/or orchestrate the incident response process. In other words, we are moving in the right direction (but we’re not there yet). Here are some of the biggest cybersecurity challenges IT teams are dealing with and how automation can provide the ideal solution.

Staffing Shortage

Perhaps the biggest challenge many IT departments face today is the distinct shortage of qualified professionals who are skilled in the area of cybersecurity. While there are certainly plenty of folks working their way up the ranks and pursuing an education in this area, until they officially hit the workforce, the struggle to keep up will continue. As such, many organizations are turning to automation to bridge this gap and provide the protection and support that human workers cannot.

End to End Monitoring

We recently published an article that outlines why monitoring systems alone are simply not enough to maintain network and data security. A big part of this is due to the fact that these tools only cover half of the process, leaving organizations vulnerable. What’s needed is a closed-loop workflow that covers both the monitoring component as well as appropriate incident analysis and subsequent resolution. This can be achieved through automated cybersecurity incident response, which handles the process from start to completion.

Volume of Alerts

Today’s IT departments are dealing with a volume of incoming alerts that is almost mind boggling. As such, alert fatigue is becoming a huge problem. Simply put, even if they worked non-stop, round the clock, it’s not possible for human workers to handle the barrage of threats that are occurring on a daily basis. Enter automation, which shifts the burden and allows technology to do the heavy lifting, freeing up IT personnel to focus their skills on other mission-critical tasks and projects.

Complexity of Threats

Not only is the number of incoming incidents posing a significant challenge to today’s IT professionals, but the complexity of these threats is also increasing at a lightning speed. Today’s hackers are much more sophisticated, initiating much more targeted and effective attacks that are giving IT departments a real run for their money. The only way to combat these advanced persistent threats is to fight fire with fire, using automation technology to thwart would-be attacks.

Is your IT team feeling overwhelmed, bogged down and burnt out? We invite you to experience for yourself how the right IT automation and orchestration platform can turn things around for the better.

Download your copy of eyeShare today or request a free demo of our brand new next generation platform.





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A Smarter Way to Manage System Alerts

A Smarter Way to Manage System AlertsOne of the most important roles of the IT team is managing incoming alerts and incidents in the most efficient manner possible. Doing so effectively not only protects the organization from incoming security threats, but it also helps to reduce internal issues, such as system outages. Yet, with the relentless barrage of incoming alerts pouring in on a daily basis, many of which are false positives, it’s easy to become overwhelmed and risk the chance of critical issues slipping through the cracks. The good news is there is a solution: IT process automation. Here’s how.

Consider first that most corporations employ the use of some type of monitoring system, which allows technology to do much of the work in keeping an eye out for problems – both external and internal. The problem is, these monitoring systems are often not effective in streamlining the actual process of managing incoming alerts. In other words, it’s very much like having only a piece of the puzzle, which is somewhat effective but missing certain key components that are necessary to get real, measurable results.

Enter IT process automation. When integrated with a monitoring system, such as Solarwinds, automation can take incident management to a whole new level. Working in collaboration together, these tools help to identify, analyze and prioritize incoming alerts and also ensure that notification is sent to the appropriate party in the event that a serious issue is detected. What’s more, notifications can be customized based on preference, with escalations being sent via email, SMS or telephone.

In addition to bringing more order to the incident management process, integrating IT process automation with your monitoring system can also vastly improve the speed and efficiency of incident response. Automated workflows can be created to open, update and close tickets in the service desk, escalating those that require human input and automatically handling those that can be resolved electronically.

The results of such a collaboration is a closed-loop solution that is much more efficient and highly effective in reducing response and resolution time, which means less downtime and faster mean time to repair (MTTR) for your organization. Let’s take a look at a real-life example of how integrating a monitoring system with ITPA can help streamline the incident workflow:

  1. The monitoring system detects an incident within the IT infrastructure and sends out an alert.
  2. The alert is picked up by the IT process automation software, which immediately triggers a predefined workflow.
  3. As part of this workflow, a trouble ticket is automatically created in the service desk.
  4. The appropriate party or parties receive notification via their preferred method (email, SMS or phone).
  5. The system waits for acknowledgement and response from the network admin.
  6. Upon response, the ITPA workflow will execute the appropriate task to address and correct the problem.
  7. The ITPA system then sends notification to the network admin advising of the recovery and automatically updates the service ticket accordingly.

This process essentially closes the loop on incident management, taking the entire process from start to completion with little if any need for human intervention. So, while utilizing a quality monitoring system is important, leveraging the power of IT process automation as a complement to that system can truly bring your IT operations to a whole new level.

Ready to get started today? Check out our available solutions or download your free trial to get started right away.





eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response




Why Monitoring Tools Aren’t Enough to Prevent Cybersecurity Breaches

Why Monitoring Tools Aren’t Enough to Prevent Cybersecurity BreachesThere are literally millions upon millions of attempted cyber-attacks being executed each and every day. Yet, many organizations are still only employing the bare minimum in cybersecurity protection – monitoring systems. While these programs may have once been sufficient in thwarting off potential breaches, they are no longer capable of adequately keeping businesses safe from harm. If you are among those companies relying solely on monitoring tools to safeguard your network and sensitive data, here are a few reasons you may want to reconsider.

First and foremost, the sheer volume of cyber threats has increased at a mind-boggling rate and all trends indicate this will only continue to get worse as time goes by. The fact is, today’s cyber criminals are becoming more relentless than ever before, which means organizations must remain on high alert 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. With the amount of incoming incidents on the rise, most monitoring tools simply cannot keep. As a result, legitimate threats have a better chance of pinpointing a company’s vulnerability and exploiting it.

In addition to the number of threats coming in on a daily basis, the complexity of these incidents is also evolving. Sure, there are still some relatively rudimentary type attacks crafted by amateur hackers, and modern monitoring systems are usually more than up to the task of handling these. It’s the multifarious and highly targeted threats (APTs) being instituted by sophisticated criminals that companies must be vigilant against, and unfortunately this is where most monitoring platforms fall short.

A combination of these two factors make it increasingly evident that in order to remain steadfastly secure against the relentless onslaught of complex cybersecurity attacks, IT teams must take additional measures. Short of employing an army of security professionals to work round the clock, something even the biggest, most successful organization cannot reasonably do, there is another, much more affordable, effective and feasible solution: automation.

Automated cybersecurity incident response allows companies to create a closed-loop process that incorporates the monitoring function with instant, advanced threat analysis and response. Once the two platforms are successfully integrated, any incident detected by the monitoring tool triggers an automated workflow that effectively evaluates the threat for legitimacy and then determines next steps based on the results of this analysis.

If the threat is real, the automation and orchestration platform then either takes the necessary steps to isolate and remediate on its own or escalates it to the appropriate party. Of course, it’s also important to recognize that even the strongest, most sophisticated IR strategies are not entirely fool-proof. This is another area where automated cybersecurity incident response is valuable. In those rare instances that a threat does, in fact, make its way passed the existing security measures, an automated platform can help get critical systems back and running faster.

Essentially, automated cybersecurity incident response becomes a force multiplier, supporting the monitoring process and taking it a step further to dramatically reduce the likelihood of a successful breach taking place. Best of all, this type of scenario eliminates the need to employ a large security team. And because this type of setup is always on, the organization remains as safe as possible any time, day or night.

In reality, the world of cyber-crime has changed and will continue to do so at a rapid pace. The monitoring tools and applications that were once enough to keep sensitive data safe are no longer adequate. Today’s IR requires a much greater degree of intricacy and the same level of advanced technology that the criminals behind these dangerous threats are using.

Is your organization truly safe? Request a free demo of Ayehu IT automation and orchestration and see for yourself how this innovative technology can bring your company’s cybersecurity to the next level.

 





How to Get Critical Systems Back Online in Minutes