How Top Organizations Are Planning for Security Automation and Orchestration

How Top Organizations Are Planning for Security Automation and OrchestrationMost business leaders today are feeling the pressure to innovate. But sometimes it’s ok to live by the old adage that you don’t always have to reinvent the wheel to be successful. In some areas, it’s entirely ok to look around, figure out what other companies are doing right and mirror their actions. Such is the case with security automation and orchestration.

The folks over at ESG Research polled more than 400 cybersecurity professionals to find out what today’s top firms are doing to keep their sensitive data safe. Here’s what they discovered (and how you can implement the same strategies for similar results).

  • 35% are looking to use security automation and orchestration technology to integrate external threat intelligence with the collection and analysis of internal security data. The key difference here is that these organizations want to move away from manual security investigations and instead use automation to do the heavy lifting, thereby streamlining the entire workflow.
  • 30% want to use security automation and orchestration technology to enhance the functionality of their existing tools. Typically speaking, this is focused on orchestrated workflows as a component of such things as incident response, security investigations and remediation tasks.
  • 29% are looking to leverage security automation and orchestration technology to automate basic remediation tasks, such as generating new firewall rules upon the receipt of an IoC list.
  • 28% are using security automation and orchestration technology to compare and contextualize data using the output of multiple other tools. Envision a bunch of threat detection tools generating alerts and producing reports. Today’s top security pros want to leverage security automation and orchestration to correlate these outputs to achieve a more holistic perspective of security incidents.
  • 22% are looking to use security automation and orchestration technology as a way to integrate their security and IT operations tools. This enables security analysts to access asset databases, CMDBs, trouble ticketing systems, etc.

IT executives are now viewing security operations much the same way that Henry Ford approached building vehicles. CIOs, CISOs and other security professionals recognize that manual processes aren’t capable of scaling to meet increasing demand, so they’re turning to new technologies as a solution. Just as Ford used a production line, IT leaders are leveraging security automation and orchestration platforms.

Ultimately, what the study from ESG uncovered was that successful security automation and orchestration comes as a result of a strong commitment to process improvement, a well-planned, phased implementation strategy and solid partnerships with tech vendors who have in-depth security operations experience.

Ayehu is prepared to become that partner. Take our next generation IT automation and orchestration platform for a test drive today to get started.

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

4 Cybersecurity Trends that Will Plague Businesses in 2018

4 Cybersecurity Trends that Will Plague Businesses in 2018We’re nearly one full month into 2018 and it’s clear already that cybersecurity remains one of the top priorities for businesses across the globe. Preparing in advance and having an idea of what to expect can help strengthen your defense. To help, we’ve identified a few of the top global security threats that experts believe have the potential to become significant obstacles for businesses over the coming months.

The IoT

The Internet of Things continues to add several new layers of risk to organizations across the globe. Unfortunately, the majority of IoT devices are not inherently secure, so as more companies adopt those IoT devices, they are unwittingly adding more vulnerability to their network and infrastructure. Additionally, there remains a lack of transparency surrounding what information is being captured and transmitted. When a cybersecurity breach does occur and the truth comes out, companies will likely be held responsible by both customers and regulators.

Crime as a Service (CaaS)

Criminal syndicates in the cyber realm are nothing new. What’s predicted to be different in 2018, however, is that thanks to CaaS, less sophisticated “aspirant” cyber-attackers (even those without a great amount of technical knowledge) will be able to purchase tools and services that will enable them to carry out attacks that they would otherwise been incapable of conducting on their own. Essentially, anyone who wishes to get into the cybersecurity game will have much easier entry moving forward, which means even more risk for businesses, particularly small to mid-sized ones.

Supply Chain

The supply chain is inherently vulnerable for a number of reasons; namely due to the fact that a good deal of sensitive and valuable information is typically shared amongst suppliers. As that data is shared, it results in a loss of control, which increases the risk of compromise in integrity, confidentiality and availability. The challenge lies in knowing precisely where information is at every stage of the lifecycle so it can be adequately protected. To address this, organizations must prioritize finding the weakest places in their supply chains so they can properly address those vulnerabilities before a problem arises.


With the European Union General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) set to take effect within the next few months, a whole new layer of complexity will be added to critical asset management. GDPR isn’t just about compliance. It’s about being able to pinpoint any area throughout your organization and along your supply chain and understand how personal data is being managed and protected. If you’re not yet prepared for this upcoming deadline, here are a few guidelines to get you started.

These are, of course, just a few of the many cybersecurity threats that exist in the landscape today. The key to overcoming these threats is to implement a strong strategy that focuses not only on prevention, but also rapid detection and remediation.

Ayehu’s Next Generation Automation and Orchestration platform seamlessly integrates with all the top monitoring and incident response programs to become a cybersecurity force multiplier. Faster response means less impact on your company’s bottom line. Take it for a test drive today to learn more!

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

Cybersecurity: To Automate or Not to Automate?

cybersecurity - to automate or not to automateThere’s no question that cybersecurity incidents are increasingly on the rise. In fact, the numbers are steadily climbing at an alarming rate. As a result, it’s becoming increasingly evident that businesses must be proactive and extremely diligent about protecting their sensitive data from falling into the wrong hands. Could automated cybersecurity incident response be the answer?

In years past, the traditional 4-step method of managing security incidents was sufficient. IT personnel would prepare as much as they could for possible attacks and spend a great deal of their time analyzing the events that were detected to determine their legitimacy and severity. From there, the next step was to contain or eradicate the problem and work toward system recovery as quickly as possible. IT would then evaluate their response to develop better practices for use in the future. For a while, this was enough to keep cyber-attackers in check.

Unfortunately, with online cybersecurity breaches becoming much more frequent and sophisticated, the old method for security incident response is no longer effective. It’s simply not fast enough, nor is it proactive or thorough enough to keep up with the changing demands. Today, IT personnel just don’t have the capacity to handle such an influx of threats, nor do they have the time or bandwidth to evaluate and address every event as it comes in. This can lead to devastating and costly breaches.

When you add automation into the cybersecurity incident response process, however, all of these shortcomings can be addressed and eliminated. With a quality automation product, the IT department can streamline their incident management process. Incoming events are detected and the system automatically evaluates, prioritizes and escalates. This eliminates false positives and ensures that legitimate threats are always detected, reported and addressed in a timely manner.

Additionally, automation can then facilitate a seamless, closed-loop process, updating the incident log, resolving alerts and tracking and documenting all processes to be used for developing best practices moving forward. An automated system can also help IT departments to become more proactive by identifying and mitigating vulnerabilities. Most importantly, with an automated process, systems can be back up and running much faster, reducing costly downtime and improving customer satisfaction.

Today’s automation products can be easily and seamlessly integrated with existing incident management programs, such as Solarwinds and Servicenow, to extend and enhance legacy systems without the need for an entire platform replacement or overhaul.

With cyber-attacks steadily on the rise, businesses of every shape, size and industry are at risk of becoming victims. The best way to protect yourself, your organization and those whose sensitive information may be at risk is to establish a solid cybersecurity incident response plan.

Is your company protected? Launch your free product demo of Ayehu today to see how automation can make your cybersecurity as close to impenetrable as possible.

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How to Overcome IT Security Staff Burnout

Overcoming IT security staff burnoutToday’s IT security professionals are under increasing pressure to manage and assure the highest level data protection for their organizations and clients. With the number of incoming threats steadily on the rise and staffing numbers remaining stagnant (or dropping), those in this high-stress industry are burning out at a rapid pace. IT leadership is often painfully aware of the issue at hand, but at a loss as to how to help ease the burden their staff is under. The good news is there is a solution and it’s not nearly as difficult or costly as you may think. But first, we must get to the heart of the problem.

As IT security threats and their subsequent impact continue to increase in number, frequency and complexity, businesses are scrambling to keep up. Furthermore, budgetary restrictions and a skills shortage are also wreaking havoc on IT security teams. As a result, qualified personnel are finding themselves inundated with a relentless stream of cyber-attacks, which is contributing greatly to the high level of turnover in the IT security field. Simply put, employees are overworked and it’s taking a significant toll.

Couple this with the fact that the incident response and remediation process for most companies is still partially or entirely manual. As such, system and network vulnerabilities are not properly being managed, which leads to increased risk to the organization. Further, dependence on tools like spreadsheets, emails and phone calls to handle incidents is not an adequate or effective way to manage incidents. There’s simply too much risk involved, which in turn puts even more pressure on IT security personnel. Something’s got to give.

As a result of all of these critical factors, many organizations are turning to automation to help manage the IT workload and improve service levels. More specifically, IT security professionals are beginning to see the power of automation for more effective management of incident response and remediation. In fact, with the right tool, existing systems and applications can be linked to create a more uniform infrastructure and close the loop on the incident response process.

Additionally, integrating automation into your incident response strategy can provide the following benefits:

  • Remove manual processes that slow response time. Managing IT security incidents manually often results in costly delays and bottlenecks, which slow your mean time to resolution. Automation eliminates these manual processes and thereby dramatically improve MTTR.
  • Enable the use of a single platform for IT security incident management. Gain real-time visibility and maintain control over the entire process to ensure ownership and accountability.
  • Prioritize and manage risk based on criticality. The IT security team can focus on those incidents that present the greatest degree of risk to the organization while the automation tool can handle less significant incidents without the need for human intervention.
  • Free up and optimize use of skilled staffing resources. IT security personnel can be freed up to focus their time, efforts and advanced skillsets on other critical tasks and issues.
  • Gain greater visibility over all IT security incidents. Centralized dashboard allows IT leadership to get real-time updates on any and all issues currently being handled.

As you can clearly see, automation is proving to be the ideal solution to easing the heavy burden of today’s IT security personnel. If you’re not yet taking advantage of the many benefits this technology has to offer for your organization, the time to do so is now.

Get started today by launching your free demo of Ayehu.

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

Here’s What Cybersecurity Data Breaches Cost in 2017

Here’s What Cybersecurity Data Breaches Cost in 2017Welcome to 2018! As we usher in a new year, it can be helpful to take a look back at what occurred over the past 12 months, particularly in terms of cybersecurity. Recognizing what threats are out there and having an accurate understanding of what those risks could potentially cost your business can help you better prepare for and prevent such events from impacting your organization in the future. To gain some insight in this area, we turned to the 2017 Cost of Data Breach Study. Here’s a synopsis of what the study uncovered.

The annual study was conducted by IBM Security and Ponemon Institute, polling 63 U.S. organizations covering 16 different industry sectors. At a glance, the numbers look like the following:

  • Average number of breached records: 28,512
  • Average total cost of data breach: $7.35 million (up from $7.01 million)
  • Increase in total cost of data breach: 5%
  • Average cost per lost or stolen record: $225 (up from $221)
  • Increase in cost per lost or stolen record: 2%

How is the cost of a data breach calculated?

One of the biggest takeaways from this year’s study was the various factors that are used to calculate the cost of a data breach. Some are obvious, others are more obtuse. Here’s what organizations should take into consideration when evaluating risk:

  • Size of breach and/or number of records lost or stolen
  • Time required to identify and contain a breach (this number decreasing, thanks in large part to organizations investing in intelligent cybersecurity technologies)
  • Detection and escalation costs (including costs associated with investigations, assessments, audits and communication management)
  • Post-breach costs, including the expense of notifying victims and appropriate authorities as well as legal expenditures
  • Churn rate (loss of customers due to reputational damage following a data breach)

Some of the factors that are recommended for reducing these costs include the use of cybersecurity analytics as well as recruiting and retaining experienced, knowledgeable personnel. Implementing strategies and advanced technologies that can limit the number of records lost or stolen can also help organizations lower costs and mitigate risks.

Additional Noteworthy Findings

Narrowing down the 23-page report, here are a few of the most pertinent findings:

  • Both the individual and total average cost of data breaches for an organization have reached record highs
  • The amount of abnormal churn (i.e. loss of customers outside of normal course of business) is also on the rise
  • Heavily regulated industries experience higher data breach costs (particularly health care and financial services)
  • Detection and escalation costs are at a record high
  • Malicious or criminal attacks remain the primary cause of data breach (and the most costly)
  • Extensive use of mobile platforms has increased cybersecurity risk
  • Costs associated with lost business continue to increase
  • The use of intelligent cybersecurity analytics reduces the per capita cost of a breach

More money is being spent on indirect cybersecurity costs than direct ones. These costs include the time employees spend on notifications of data breaches as well as incident investigations/remediation efforts.

And, a point that’s so important it’s worth mentioning again: the time it takes to identify and contain a data breach has a tremendous impact on the costs associated with such breaches. In this year’s study, it took an average of 206 days for organizations to detect an incident and another 55 days to contain it. For mean time to identify (MTTI) of fewer than 100 days, the average cost associated was $5.99 million. For MTTI greater than 100 days, however, that cost increases significantly to $8.70 million. Likewise, costs associated with mean time to contain (MTTC) rose from $5.87 million (less than 30 days) to $8.83 million (30 days or more).

The overall conclusion from these facts and figures is that cybersecurity continues to be an incredibly costly risk to organizations. To mitigate this risk (and the hefty costs associated with it), business leaders must take a proactive approach, developing strategies and leveraging advanced incident response technology to stay a step ahead of hackers. Intelligent automation powered by AI and machine learning can provide this level of security.

To see the Ayehu platform in action and prepare your company for an uncertain future, click here.

How to Get Critical Systems Back Online in Minutes

Why Prevention Is No Longer Enough for Cybersecurity

Why Prevention Is No Longer Enough for CybersecurityHow would you know if your cybersecurity strategy failed to detect a legitimate threat? It could happen one of two ways: either you’ll get lucky and find it yourself or a third party – whether it’s a customer, an auditors or someone else – will catch it first. Sadly, the latter is most often the case, which means that data breach could easily cost you as much reputationally as it will financially.

The fact is, prevention strategies and technologies, such as firewalls, antivirus software, encryption and other security controls, are designed to block attackers from gaining access to your infrastructure. These tools are certainly important and can be effective. They should now, however, be your only line of defense.

If we’ve learned anything from the high profile data breaches that have graced the headlines over the past year, it’s that determined attackers will find their way in, despite the presence of preventative technology. As such, it’s equally important that you have the right strategy in place to be able to detect and address threats that are already inside your infrastructure.

Detection Monitors Your Monitors

We all want to trust that our prevention strategies are working, but as mentioned above – how can you know if they’re not (and more importantly, before it’s too late)? That’s why detection tools are so important.

Automated detection technology, such as continuous monitoring and automated alerting, provide ongoing visibility into all of the activity that’s occurring within your infrastructure. Not only are these tools designed to keep you abreast of known issues, such as previously disclosed cybersecurity threats, but they’re also designed to identify and alert about new and unknown threats that may have successfully slipped past your preventative defenses.

The information gathered from this monitoring and alerting enables IT agents to make quick, data-driven decisions, such as whether to cut access to a certain application, patch a server, or implement a new workflow to better detect similar events in the future. Furthermore, with the right platform, remediation of threats can be entirely automated, enabling round-the-clock protection. These are things most prevention tools cannot accomplish, because they simply were not designed to do so.

While tools like antivirus software or firewalls can mitigate certain known or common security events, they aren’t designed to detect new threats. Additionally, most prevention tools lack the alerting functionality to notify key personnel in real-time about any issues that may arise. And with new cybersecurity threats constantly on the horizon, it’s clear that prevention alone isn’t going to be enough to keep your infrastructure secure. To achieve maximum protection, detection is necessary.

Rapidly Evolving Landscape

One of the biggest reasons detection and remediation are becoming a growing necessity is because many organizations are adopting cloud technology. The cloud enables businesses to operate at scale, which means rapid changes and an increasing number of endpoints to protect. Detection addresses this evolution and scales seamlessly alongside the business.

Yesterday’s static, on-premise environments are quickly being replaced by cloud solutions, which makes infrastructures much more vulnerable to today’s invasive and sophisticated attacks. In other words, we are operating on an entirely different landscape. Detection enables IT teams to gain visibility into all of the hosts running at any given moment and shut any of them down to stop threats in their tracks.

Prevention and Detection Working Together

We aren’t recommending that you scrap your prevention strategy. To the contrary, prevention tools are still effective in doing what they were designed to do, which is keeping known cybersecurity threats out. Detection simply allows you to add another layer of protection. When working in tandem, prevention tools help weed out a good portion of threats while detection tools dig deeper, collecting critical real-time data about security events and enabling security teams to respond immediately.

In this context, you can think of detection and remediation kind of like gap insurance for your infrastructure. Having both in place, when a point of failure inevitably occurs, your second line of defense will kick in. This provides a much more robust and therefore more effective cybersecurity strategy.


With today’s threat landscape becoming even more dangerous by the day, there’s never been a more critical time to strengthen your organization’s cybersecurity posture. Establishing a strategy that integrates prevention with detection, alerting and remediation will add the layers of protection you need to stay a step ahead of your attackers.

Is your prevention strategy falling short? Beef up your protection with Ayehu. Take our automation and orchestration tool for a test drive today and see how automated cybersecurity detection can make your company safer.

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

4 Cybersecurity Challenges that Could Be Placing Your Infrastructure at Risk

In today’s digital age, network availability and reliability are critical to businesses of every size and industry. A strong, secure infrastructure is the key to keeping customers happy, protecting your brand reputation and ensuring positive movement in terms of both revenue and profits. Achieving this type of maximum security, however, is becoming increasingly challenging in the face of escalating cyber-attacks.

Losing network access is no longer just a minor inconvenience for today’s businesses. Not only can it be incredibly costly from a financial standpoint, but it can also cause irreparable damage to a company’s reputation. And the cold, hard truth is, conventional methods for protection are no longer adequate, especially given the increase in frequency, intensity and size of cyber-attacks.

To achieve a secure infrastructure, IT leaders must address the four main challenges that are standing in their way. Those challenges are as follows.

Lack of Visibility

Maintaining a clear and accurate view of all devices and network assets across physical, virtual and cloud infrastructure is critical to maximum protection. After all, you can’t protect what you cannot see. The challenge lies in the reliance on traditional security systems to track and monitor the network. These antiquated solutions do not provide a complete view of all devices and assets, leaving some vulnerable to compromise.

To address this, IT leaders should leverage solutions that allow them to centralize and automate network discovery, enhance visibility and quickly identify attack points, anomalies, patterns and other suspicious activity.

Poor Vulnerability Detection

As challenging as it is to obtain a consolidated view of devices and network assets using conventional methods, spotting and quickly addressing vulnerabilities in those assets can be just as difficult.

Vulnerability scans can be helpful, but since they aren’t capable of continuously monitoring every single device, virtual machine and end point across complex infrastructures, nor can they pinpoint threats generated from configuration errors, non-compliant devices and outdated components, they simply aren’t sufficient enough to keep organizations secure.4 Cyber Security Challenges that Could Be Placing Your Infrastructure at Risk

Without comprehensive insight on vulnerabilities, networks are no match for the sophisticated cyber-attacks of today.

DNS-Based Attack Protection

Exploiting DNS has proven to be a highly effective way to disrupt and disable networks. Attackers utilize DNS pathways to ravage networks in a variety of ways. For instance, hackers often use DDos attacks to flood DNS servers with bogus requests, swap out legitimate URLS for fake ones that cause websites to appear to be down when they’re not, and create diversions that allow them to hide other types of attack.

The reason DNS has become the method of choice for so many cyber-criminals is because conventional infrastructure security methods are incapable of protecting DNS. To overcome this risk, IT leaders should seek out advanced solutions that are specifically designed and developed to comprehensively and automatically protect DNS from would-be attacks.

Lack of Integration within Security Ecosystem

Many companies employ the use of a large number of disparate security solutions from a variety of different vendors. This results in silos that are incapable of working together and sharing critical information, which results in a significant challenge to security teams who are responsible to take action amidst a dynamic and ever-evolving security landscape.

To complicate matters further, security teams in this situation also find themselves drowning in a sea of increasing threats with little to no clear direction on which threat to act upon first and why.

The solution is to create a network that is made up of systems, software and applications that can be fully integrated with one another with the goal of enhancing the performance of the entire cybersecurity ecosystem. This type of setup enables security teams to gain greater visibility and remediate swiftly to mitigate risk.


A failure to adequately protect your network and infrastructure can result in much more than just a little bit of downtime. A sophisticated and complex cyber-attack can cripple your network and place the reputation as well as the careers of everyone involved in jeopardy. To ensure maximum protection and network availability, organizations must close the gaps and address the vulnerabilities that other solutions create.

Integratable solutions which involve automation and data-driven intelligence can effectively improve visibility and enhance threat detection across even the most complex infrastructures, thwarting attacks and optimizing the performance of the entire security ecosystem.

Don’t get caught on the bad end of a cyber-threat. Provide your network and infrastructure with maximum protection. Launch your free product demo of Ayehu today to get started.

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

How Uber Could Have Prevented Their Latest Cybersecurity Breach

How Uber Could Have Prevented Their Latest Cybersecurity BreachIn case you missed it, ride sharing company Uber has recently come under fire due to the circumstances surrounding a data breach that occurred in late 2016, but that the company didn’t publicly report until just last month (nearly an entire year later). The hackers behind the breach were able to access the personal information of 57 million users, including names, email addresses, phone numbers. Also stolen were 600,000 driver’s license numbers of Uber drivers. With yet another high profile brand making headlines, it’s time to ask once again, could a stronger cybersecurity strategy prevented this fiasco?

What happened?

According to Uber CEO, Dara Khosrowshahi, two hackers broke into the company’s GitHub account, a third-party, cloud-based service that many companies use to store code. It was on this site that the hackers located the username and password they needed to access user data, which was stored on an Amazon server. Sadly, experts are saying the attack was not sophisticated, which means it could have been prevented had the company been more vigilant with its cybersecurity practices.

Where they went wrong

The breach itself isn’t what’s got Uber in hot water right now, although users and regulatory agencies are rightfully outraged. What’s most upsetting is that, rather than alerting users that their information had been compromised and notifying authorities of the breach (as is required by law), Uber instead handed over a $100,000 ransom to the hackers. According to Uber representatives, they were assured and therefore believed that in exchange for that payment, the data was destroyed.

The problem is, by failing to report the breach, not only were users placed in a precarious situation, having their personal information unknowingly in the hands of criminals, but the company also failed to act lawfully and in compliance with regulations. As a result, it’s likely that Uber will face consequences, both at the state and federal level.

Furthermore, when businesses choose to pay hackers what they demand, it only perpetuates the problem of cybercrime and encourages others to follow suit. Similar cybersecurity events occurred recently to well-known brands Netflix and HBO, however, neither of those organizations paid the ransom demanded.

A better solution

The bottom line is, what happened to Uber could easily happen to any business. And paying the ransom – even if it did result in the data being destroyed – didn’t address the actual problem, which is poor cybersecurity planning. Keeping usernames and passwords located on an easy-to-access platform like GitHub was mistake number one.

The second mistake Uber made was not having the right technology in place. For instance, had they employed automated incident response, they would have been alerted of the breach immediately and quite possibly could have avoided having to pay the ransom in the first place. And, thirdly, of course, was the company’s failure to notify appropriate parties. For that, they will likely pay much more than the original ransom amount and reputationally, the company may never quite recover.

Uber’s latest PR nightmare should serve as a reminder to business owners, board members and IT leaders across the globe. The question is no longer whether your company will get hacked, but rather when. Being prepared, leveraging technology and adhering to all state and federal regulations can help your business weather the storm and emerge unscathed on the other side.

Want to see exactly how automation powered by AI can help guard your business against hackers? Click here to take Ayehu for a test drive!

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

Is your organization prepared for a cyber attack? Here are 5 steps to strengthen your defense.

Is your organization prepared for a cyber attack?Is your organization truly prepared to handle a potential data breach? With well-known brands and industry leaders regularly being dragged through the mud by the media due to lack of protection of sensitive data, it’s becoming abundantly clear that nobody is safe anymore. In fact, experts predict that threats to businesses will only continue to increase, both in frequency and in complexity. If your cyber security incident response strategy could use a little more oomph, here are 5 things you can do today to fortify your level of protection.

Identify Areas of Risk – It’s often said that to catch a criminal, one must think like that criminal – to get into his or her head and view the world from a different perspective. When it comes to cyber security, the same concept can and should be applied. Start by identifying which data your organization possesses that would be most likely to be targeted. Then, develop your cyber security incident response plan around that.

Practice Makes Perfect – You probably already conduct regular fire drills to ensure the safety of your personnel in the event of an emergency. Shouldn’t your cyber security incident response plan receive the same level of testing and tweaking? Your strategy should always remain fluid and reviewed on a regular basis to ensure its effectiveness so that when, not if, an attack occurs, you will be ready. As a starting point, review past records to identify which types of incidents you’re most prone to.

Make it a Team Effort – It’s important to remember that cyber-attacks don’t just have the potential for monetary loss, but they also often result in reputational damage and even lawsuits. In order for your cyber security incident response plan to be truly effective, it must cover every angle. That’s why it’s a good idea to include other departments, like legal and public relations, in the process.

Keep Leadership In the Loop – While the task of protecting sensitive data may be handled primarily by IT, incident response is something that should be a company-wide priority. That includes top leadership, such as your C-Level executives and your Board of Directors. Involve these decision makers in as much of the process as possible, from planning to response strategy, and encourage them to be active participants.

Empower Your Team – Your IR strategy is only as good as the people you’ve got managing it and the tools they’ve been given to do their jobs well. Make sure that your IT team has access to everything they need to stay a step ahead of online threats, such as incorporating automation into the cyber security incident response plan to make response and resolution faster and more effective. The more you invest in this area upfront, the more it will pay off in the long term.

In conclusion, the goal of any individual or team tasked with managing cyber security must include making their response and remediation strategy as strong as possible. The best way to achieve that goal is to ensure that the right people, processes and technology are all aligned accordingly. The eyeShare product can provide the ideal solution, bringing everything together and creating a much more solid defense across the board.

Ready to get started? Request a free demo today!

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

Why artificial intelligence will change cybersecurity as we know it

AI and Intelligent Automation Network Guest Post

Guest post originally published in AI & Intelligent Automation Network.

Artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning are becoming embedded in businesses across the globe, and cybersecurity is quickly emerging as a key area of focus for enterprises striving to enhance the security of sensitive data.

Despite this growing adoption, however, many are still struggling with misconceptions and confusions surrounding the different types of solutions available on the market today.

To set these misconceptions to rest once and for all, one must recognize certain key considerations around AI and understand how it is disrupting the information and network security realm.

It’s equally important to recognize the difference between traditional automation and intelligent automation and its impact on cybersecurity. With this knowledge in hand, business leaders can then begin to capitalize on the opportunities and long-term potential of AI and automation in the intelligent enterprise.

The role of AI in cybersecurity 

Perhaps the ultimate turning point in terms of organizations recognizing the critical importance of adequate network security was the Target breach of 2013. The utter magnitude of that breach opened the eyes of many and placed the topic of cybersecurity front and center on the list of business priorities.

Since that time, there has been a steady influx of attacks that have evolved and increased in both complexity and frequency, subsequently increasing the need for fast, accurate incident response and remediation.

The challenge many organizations face, however, is how? Hiring additional staff isn’t always feasible, whether it’s due to budgetary restraints or simply a lack of qualified personnel.

Additionally, given the sophistication and relentlessness of today’s cyber-attacks, many organizations are finding that human ability is no match. That’s where automation and orchestration technology has become a true game changer.

Combined with artificial intelligence and machine learning capability, automated cybersecurity is meeting attackers head on and essentially fighting fire with fire.

In the context of cybersecurity, AI is able to perceive its own environment well enough that it can independently identify threats and take the appropriate action, all without the need for human intervention. AI is particularly powerful from an incident response perspective because it is adept at recognizing patterns and anomalies far better than any human agent ever could.

Essentially, it’s like having an army of intelligent robots standing at the ready, 24/7/365 to detect and respond to threats. Few, if any, human workforces can accomplish such a feat, especially with such tremendous accuracy.

Machine learning is bringing that power to the next level because it can “learn” and improve on its own, based on factors such as the outcome of previous actions taken. Together with artificial intelligence, machine learning can effectively be used to predict future outcomes based on past events. This can help humans make more data-driven and therefore more accurate business decisions. And when the monumental task of incident management can be shifted from human to machine, businesses are better able to allocate resources toward the most valuable human-led tasks.

Simply put, as the amount of data continues to grow and the global threat landscape continues to advance, both in number and sophistication of attackers, organizations can no longer rely on antiquated tools and manual activities.

Automated cybersecurity incident response powered by AI and machine learning will enable business leaders to stay a step ahead of the threats.

Traditional vs. intelligent automation

IT automation is certainly not a new concept, but the technologies behind it have progressed significantly in recent years. As a result of these advancements, businesses are benefiting in a number of tangible ways, including that of enhanced network security.

But what’s the difference between the traditional automation tools of the past and today’s sophisticated platforms that are powered by intelligent technology?

While both technologies function with similar end-goals in mind—that is, streamlining and automating manual tasks and workflows—intelligent automation is designed to take things a step further by augmenting human intelligence. Not only is this a more cost-effective and scalable approach, but it can be implemented without having to sacrifice process quality and reliability.

Ultimately, the key differentiator between traditional and intelligent automation is the ability to make decisions.

Basic automation tools are capable of gathering and organizing data into reports that human agents can then use to forecast and plan. With machine learning, that data can be analyzed by artificial intelligence at a rate of speed and accuracy far greater than humans are capable of. The result is more valuable information that can facilitate improved business decisions.

The future of AI in cybersecurity

The opportunities that AI-powered automation presents to the enterprise are many, particularly in terms of enhanced network security.

For instance, intelligent automation is capable of quickly detecting and identifying not only known but also entirely new classes of threats. Over time, these agentless systems will continue to learn, adapt and improve on their own, becoming even more effective at managing incidents and analyzing the changing behaviors of attackers.

Additionally, deep learning algorithms will be able to sift through enormous amounts of data in real-time to uncover valuable insights into the growing threat landscape, enabling rapid and effective improvements to existing incident remediation processes.

The long-term goal of automation powered by AI is to achieve an even greater level of flexibility along with enhanced thinking capability that matches the human mind as closely as possible. The result will be a genius-level platform that is faster, more accurate, more consistent and far more effective at achieving maximum cybersecurity than any human team could ever accomplish.

Such a system, just like the human cognition it’s designed to simulate, will be capable of learning new processes, adapting according to its changing environment, arriving at its own conclusions and making its own intelligent decisions.

Perhaps the most interesting fact of all is that this type of system is not some far off distant vision of the future, but a present reality and one that is already driving the intelligent enterprise of today with the promise of keeping it a step ahead of the threat landscape of tomorrow.

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