ITSM Automation

ITSM Automation – Start Filling in the Gaps

ITSM AutomationThe nice thing about IT Service Management platforms is their comprehensiveness. Using a single, unified umbrella, you manage and integrate a range of best practices and service components – service desk, project and service portfolio management, incidents, change, configuration management and more. All of which helps to ensure that your services stay aligned with your business requirements.

But the wealth of functionality, combined with the need to support the unique processes of each organization, brings with it a challenge – filling in gaps. Beneath the wide ITSM umbrella, you’ll find that data that needs to flow from one system to another requires some human intervention or verification; such as a service desk request for a server restart that cannot be fulfilled because it first requires an authorization in the system.

ITSM Automation is a key functionally to filling in these gaps

So despite the all-inclusive ITSM approach, there are still gaps between data silos, resulting in manual work, or inefficient, slow processes. IT process automation lets you fill these gaps to accelerate processes and improve interaction between data silos. If this sounds too theoretical and farfetched, here are two pragmatic customer examples that illustrate this point.

Filling the Gap – Automate Incident Management

A healthcare organization was using full-time help desk staff to capture alerts from the monitoring system (SolarWinds) and then decide if to open trouble tickets in Service-Now. With IT process automation, the IT team can manage alerts from the SolarWinds to automatically open and update incidents in ServiceNow. The team also added some automated workflows to troubleshoot the problem and then update and close the tickets.

Filling the Gap – Automate Change and Fulfillment

A financial customer operating across multiple geographical sites was struggling with a slow response for service request fulfillment. IT personnel would open a change request in JIRA, but even if the resolution was quite simple,  the response time was still extremely slow. With IT process automation, a request in JIRA (for example, a request to restart a remote service) triggers an automated workflow, which immediately sends an email to the service owner. Upon his approval, the workflow fulfills the request (e.g., restarts the service), and updates the JIRA ticket.

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