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What is ‘WannaCry’ Ransomware and How Can You Keep Your Organization Safe?

What is ‘WannaCry’ and How Can You Keep Your Organization Safe?If you haven’t yet heard, there’s a new kind of ransomware and it’s wreaking havoc across the globe. It’s appropriately called ‘WannaCry,’ and it has thus far claimed some 350,000 victims in over 150 countries worldwide. As these numbers appear to be on the rise, IT professionals everywhere are taking notice, attempting to head the virus-spreading malware off at the pass before they become part of the statistic. Here’s what you need to know in order to keep your organization secure.

What is WannaCry?

WannaCry is a unique form of ransomware which uses a flaw in Microsoft software to deploy a malicious virus. Given the widespread popularity of Windows, it’s not surprising that once the vulnerability was exploited, it spread rapidly across many networks, affecting organizations in almost every industry. The fact that the vulnerability was so broadly available and the ability to spread quickly without human intervention created the ideal environment in which the “worm” could flourish.

Once deployed, the Wanna Decryptor program locks all of the data on a computer system and leaves the user with only two remaining files: the WannaCry program and instructions on what to do next. Infected users are given a few days to pay the proposed ransom or risk permanent deletion of their files. A Bitcoin address is provided to which the user is advised they must pay up in order to release their data from the malware.

How can organizations protect themselves?

While most organizations have virus protection in place that is supposed to protect against ransomware, the fact that this particular strain was able to bypass so many existing protective measures to affect hundreds of organizations across the globe, including the United Kingdom’s National Health Service and Telefonica in Spain. In other words, despite some of the most sophisticated defense mechanisms, many well-known enterprises were unable to prevent the virus.

As with any other type of cyber-attack, the best defense against WannaCry is a good offense. As hundreds of IT professionals are scrambling to pick up the pieces and recover from this most recent attack, it’s become even more evident that preventing threats is simply not always possible. The key then is to be able to respond as quickly as possible to mitigate damages, something that can’t be effectively accomplished without the help of machine technology – that is, automation.

A Secret Weapon…

Rapid automated response remediates devices affected by the WannaCry virus, then blocks the ransomware’s lateral and upward propagation, thereby protecting the entire enterprise network. Suspected ransomware attempts will immediately trigger a playbook to automatically initiate remediation and mitigation procedures.

Additionally, thanks to machine learning capabilities, the automated tool can initiate security controls, build indicators of compromise and implement them on the network infrastructure. This will facilitate faster identification of existing infections as well as helping to block future ones from occurring in the first place.

The WannaCry ransomware outbreak serves as an important reminder that no organization is safe from the risk of a cyber-attack. Its massive success also reminds us that despite our most valiant efforts, preventing such an attack is simply not always possible. As such, having the right orchestration and automation platform in place to quickly pinpoint, isolate and eradicate the problem is key.

Want to give your enterprise this added level of protection? Launch your free trial of eyeShare today.

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

C-Suite Priorities: Protecting against ransomware with cyber security incident response

C-Suite Priorities: Protecting against ransomware with cyber security incident response

This article was originally published as a guest post on the Cyber Security Buzz blog.

Security executives are under increasing pressure to keep sensitive networks, systems and data safe from threats which are rapidly increasing in both frequency as well as complexity. It’s no surprise, then, that CSOs and CISOs often find themselves in the hot seat when it comes to the topic of cyber security. Their roles are changing along with the new daily challenges they face, and as such, they are working tirelessly to remain abreast of the latest cyber-threat news.

In particular, with ransomware steadily on the rise and cyber criminals developing new and improved ways to expose and exploit vulnerabilities, IT leaders have no choice but to re-examine their cyber security strategies to ensure that they are strong enough to withstand the variety of incoming threats they face. By investing in an incident response plan as the first line of defense, executives can provide the added protection of instant identification and isolation of the threat before it has a chance to wreak havoc.

The fact is, as the landscape of cyber threats continues to evolve and expand, it’s becoming abundantly clear that traditional preventative approaches to network and data security are no longer effective. In fact, even Gartner believes that detection and response are the foundation of a successful cyber security strategy. No organization is immune to potential attack and without the ability to quickly pinpoint and remediate a successful breach, the outcome could be nothing short of devastating, both from a financial as well as a reputational standpoint.

Compounding the problem is the increasingly widespread adoption of cloud technology and the IoT. Simply put, migration to the cloud fundamentally changes IT security. In a cloud or hybrid environment, the focus must shift to monitoring and managing incident response. Likewise, with more and more connected devices being incorporated into the workplace, the risk of potentially becoming a victim of a ransomware attack increases exponentially. Now, instead of a few vulnerabilities, the office becomes a potential gold mine for hackers, which means much more work for security professionals.

What’s the solution? While preventative measures, such as firewalls and malware monitors have their place, the best defense an organization can take against security breaches is a more robust incident response strategy that covers all bases. Specifically, a system that integrates with, enhances and extends the capabilities of existing systems and applications to create a more holistic, streamlined and highly-effective process.

A strong cyber security incident response strategy should be able to not only detect the signs of ransomware, but automatically analyze, isolate and contain the threat so that it cannot cause any additional damage. The isolated virus can then be eradicated and the recovery process can automatically begin, effectively mitigating damages. This type of approach essentially closes the loop, creating a much more impervious defense against cyber-attacks, regardless of when, where and how many points of entry exist. Best of all, this can be handled entirely without the need for human input, solving the staffing shortage and addressing skills gap in one fell swoop.

With the worldwide expenditure on enhancing detection and response capabilities expected to be a key priority for security buyers through 2020, the time for security executives to begin shifting their focus is now. By investing in a robust, automated cyber security incident response plan as the first line of defense, executives can provide their organizations the added level of protection they need to effectively thwart would-be attackers and manage threats in a way that will limit damages as much as possible.

To read the original published article, please click here.

How to Get Critical Systems Back Online in Minutes

5 Ways to Strengthen Your Organization’s Cybersecurity Risk Posture

5 Ways to Strengthen Your Organization’s Cybersecurity Risk PostureA company’s risk posture refers to its overarching cybersecurity plan – that is, its approach to keeping sensitive data safe from internal and external threats. This includes everything from proactive planning and prevention to implementation, management and remediation strategy. No company – large or small – is immune to a potential security breach, which means every single organization in business today should develop and maintain a strong, comprehensive risk posture. Could your strategy use a little help?

Here are five simple ways you can beef up your protection and improve where your company stands against cyber threats.

Lead by Example – Business owners and managers must take the topic of cybersecurity very serious if they want frontline employees to follow suit. The fact is, keeping data safe is everyone’s job, but leading by example is an important way to ensure that everyone across the board views security as the top priority it truly is.

Invest in Education – When we discuss the topic of cybersecurity, the vision most often conjured up is that of a sophisticated hacker, but in reality, internal parties are often the greatest risk to a company’s data security. That’s why it’s so important to invest in ongoing training to ensure that all employees understand how to keep information safe, how to spot and avoid potential incidents and what their role is in the company’s overall approach.

Close the Loop – One of the biggest problems with many companies’ risk postures today is that they are incomplete. That is, they may have invested heavily into monitoring, but have forgotten the other side of the coin, which is response and remediation. Much of the damage from a successful breach comes in the time it takes to identify and resolve the problem. Technology, like automated cybersecurity incident response, ensures you cover all your bases, reducing resolution time and mitigating damages.

Learn from the Past – A great indicator of future events is what has happened in the past. Successful breaches can become valuable learning tools to help identify and address vulnerabilities and develop stronger security practices for the future.

Test and Optimize – Cybersecurity is not a ‘set it and forget it’ task. Hackers and other sophisticated criminals are constantly honing their craft and leveraging newer and better tools and technology to achieve their unsavory goals. The only way to keep up is to adopt an agile approach to security. Testing analyzing and implementing improvements on an ongoing basis will make you better armed to go toe-to-toe with would be attackers.

Is your risk posture strong enough to prevent potentially devastating losses? If not, the time to take action is now. To try Ayehu’s cybersecurity automation platform FREE for 30 days, simply click here.

 

How to Get Critical Systems Back Online in Minutes

Manual Incident Management vs. Orchestrated Incident Management – A Tale of Two Processes

Manual Incident Management vs. Orchestrated Incident Management – A Tale of Two Processes

 

Recently we shared a blog post that explored what orchestration, how it can be used and several of the many existing business benefits. Today, we thought it might be helpful to dig even deeper and provide a real-life scenario to demonstrate the vast difference between manual and orchestrated incident management. So, without further ado, let us present to you: a tale of two processes.


Manual Incident Management

Meet Manual Joe, an IT administrator who is tasked with keeping the sensitive information of his employer secure from potential breaches. Unfortunately, Joe is buried under a sea of manual tasks, processes and workflows.

Whenever an incident occurs, it almost always means a stressful afternoon for Joe and his team. First, they receive an alert letting them know something is wrong. A hard drive has failed. A system or portion of the network isn’t functioning properly. The website isn’t responding. The list goes on and on.

Manual Joe and his team respond to these alerts by implementing a series of documented manual processes. As the day goes on, Joe’s team has to spend hours of their time hammering out these tasks and monitoring their progress. They constantly have to log in and out of various systems and leverage different tools in order to perform their job duties. It’s a huge drag.

When they are able to resolve an event, they’re elated. Unfortunately, this doesn’t happen nearly as often as it should. Instead, Joe and his team find themselves running in circles, chasing their tails and frequently wasting precious time and resources on things like false positives. Complex issues often have to be escalated to senior level agents, which results in frequent delays and a whole lot of frustration.

Meanwhile, because they are overworked and mere mortals, keeping up with the volume of incidents is becoming an exercise in futility. As a result, critical events are allowed to slip by undetected until it’s too late. In some cases, the entire organization suffers as a result.

Perhaps what frustrates Joe and his team members the most, however, is that they are all extremely talented individuals who bring a lot of value to the table. But since the vast majority of their time is spent putting out fires and carrying out repetitive, mundane tasks, those skills and talents go unused. Not only is this affecting the morale of the IT department, but the business is also missing out on the opportunity to achieve greater performance through IT innovation.

This is the life of Manual Joe and his team, day after day after painful day.


Orchestrated Incident Management                                                                                                                  

Down the street, there’s another organization where Orchestration Jane is employed. She too is an IT administrator, but unlike Joe, her company has invested in a powerful orchestration and automation platform which she and her team use to their fullest advantage.

With orchestrated incident management, Jane is able to automatically remediate the vast majority of all incoming alerts and incidents. In most cases, neither she nor her team needs to get involved in the process at all.

In an orchestrated environment, when an incident occurs, the platform automatically identifies it and implements the appropriate course of action to resolve the issue. The orchestration tool can handle every step of the process, from opening an incident ticket to keeping that ticket updated on steps taken or progress made. Once the incident is effectively resolved, the orchestration tool then updates and closes the ticket. All of this is done without any manual effort from Jane or her team.

In instances for which automated remediation cannot be achieved, the escalation process is also carried out by the orchestration platform. The appropriate individuals receive notification and can respond remotely via a number of different methods, including email or SMS text. If the initial contact does not respond in a timely manner, the next appropriate individual will be notified, and so forth. This eliminates costly and frustrating delays.

Jane and her team particularly appreciate the fact that with orchestrated incident response, there’s no need to write, deploy or maintain scripts. Instead, the platform seamlessly integrates and coordinates actions across multiple systems, servers and tools. This is a huge savings of time for the IT department.

In addition to incident response, the orchestration and automation platform Jane’s company uses also allows her to proactively schedule and execute maintenance tasks. This helps to keep the infrastructure functioning better and reduces the number of alerts that will ultimately occur.

Finally, because Jane and her team isn’t bogged down by time-consuming manual tasks, processes and workflows, they are able to focus their attention and apply their skills to higher-level projects, such as those involving planning, innovation and growth. As a result, Orchestration Jane and the rest of her crew look forward to going to work every day because they know their abilities are being put to good use.


The fact is, each of these scenarios is being played out in IT departments across the globe and in just about every industry. If you can relate more to Joe than Jane, it’s time to make a change in the right direction. Start your free trial of Ayehu orchestration and automation platform and experience for yourself what an incredible different orchestrated incident management truly can make for your organization.

Be like Jane. Download your free trial today!

Managing Cybersecurity in a Multi-Generational Workplace

While Millennials are slowly but surely beginning to take over the workplace, there are still plenty of workers from older generations infiltrating modern offices across the globe. In fact, many of the higher-up positions, such as c-suite executive roles, are currently held by individuals from Gen-X and even a few Baby Boomers still hanging on. Likewise, generation Z will slowly begin to make their way into the workforce over the coming years.

Managing operations across multiple generations can be difficult in and of itself, and the topic of cybersecurity is no exception. It’s especially challenging given the fact that each group of workers has their own experience, beliefs and opinions surrounding how to keep data secure. If your organization happens to be home to a diverse age range of employees, here are a few tips for making cybersecurity something everyone can universally maintain.

Bridging the Gap

One of the biggest issues with developing a multi-generational cybersecurity policy is the different experiences each group brings to the table. For instance, while it may be easy to incorporate security training into the new employee onboarding process, getting older workers – particularly those who are less tech-savvy – on board and supportive of cybersecurity initiatives isn’t always so easy. As a result, different types of training and educational programs might be needed based on each demographic.

A Glaring IssueManaging Cybersecurity in a Multi-Generational Workplace

To further illustrate the challenge security professionals face when dealing with a workforce from various age groups, a joint study was conducted by Citrix and the Ponemon Institute, which revealed the following:

  • 55% of respondents said that Millennials (born between 1981 and 1997) pose the greatest risk of circumventing IT security policies and use of unapproved apps in the workplace.
  • 33% said Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) are the most susceptible to phishing and social engineering scams.
  • 30% said Gen Xers (born from 1965 to 1980) were most likely to exhibit carelessness in following an organization’s security policies.

Each of these eye-opening facts must be taken into account when developing cybersecurity training and implementing organizational policies.

Tapping into Technology

Another great way to help bring different generations together to support the common goal of enhanced cybersecurity is to leverage as much technology as possible. For instance, by deploying monitoring software and integrating it with an automation and orchestration platform for enhanced incident response, technology can do much of the heavy lifting, alleviating the burden on human workers. This can help reluctant individuals to view the importance of security in a more positive light.

Universal Education is Key

It’s important to point out that while each generation may have its own mindset about security issues, there are also certain universal truths that should be taught regardless of age group. Keep in mind that hackers rarely know precisely who they are targeting. Their goal is to simply achieve their end result as quickly and easily as possible, regardless of who might be on the receiving end. Likewise, it’s important not to assume that an employee is inherently aware that they are putting the organization at risk simply because he or she is from a particular generation. As such, universal education must be a priority.

Communicate Clearly and Often

As a more tech-savvy generation makes its way into the workplace, security professionals will have the additional challenge of bringing new employees up to speed and ensuring that they fully comprehend the implications of keeping sensitive data secure. While these younger workers may be more comfortable with technology, it doesn’t necessarily mean they have a realistic understanding of how to protect the information they’re accessing and sharing. Expectations should be clearly communicated early and often to ensure optimum compliance.

What challenges has your organization had to deal with in terms of maintaining maximum cybersecurity across multiple generations of workers? Please share in the comments below!

 

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

How to Land a Skilled CISO

In today’s ever-evolving threat landscape, the role of Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) has never been more critical – especially for larger enterprises. As such, these in-demand executives have become a hot commodity, with companies clamoring to attract, hire – and most importantly – retain a skilled cybersecurity leader of their own. What’s the secret to success? Well, while there’s certainly no magic formula, there are a few key considerations that might just help your firm stand out as the ideal option for landing that talented security expert you’ve been after.

Breaking it all down…

Hiring a great CISO is a two-part process. First, your organization is tasked with locating the ideal person for the job. This part is relatively easy, because it’s something that you can control to some degree. Your hiring manager (CEO, board of directors – or whoever is tasked with filling executive roles) can search sites like LinkedIn and any of the selection of career boards to locate candidates that possess the skillsets and experience you’re seeking.

The second part of the process isn’t quite as straightforward because it involves a decision on the part of the candidates you’re courting. As mentioned, CISOs and other skilled cybersecurity professionals are in high demand today, which meanHow to Land a Skilled CISOs it’s a job seekers marketplace and probably will be for some time now. These experts have their pick of employers from which to choose. It’s up to you to demonstrate effectively why your organization is the right choice, and this is no easy feat.

One of the biggest challenges companies seeking to hire a CISO face is showing candidates that they’re approaching the hiring decision from the right perspective. Unfortunately, many companies don’t jump at bringing in a cybersecurity expert unless and until they’ve experienced some type of crisis – usually a major security breach. If you are among these organizations looking for a quick fix to your security woes, don’t expect the industries top talent to be chomping at the bit to join your team.

The best way to win over a qualified candidate for the job is to do so during normal business operations, as this is a long-term strategy that will benefit both parties. The key is to view this hire as filling an overarching need within your company. After all, effective cybersecurity isn’t something reactive, but rather a proactive and ongoing function within the business. Just as a CFO is there to oversee the continuous accounting activities of the company, the CISO should be a part of managing everyday operations of your security team, not just put out fires that already occurred.

Different strokes for different folks…

An important thing to consider when searching for a CISO to bring onboard is the current status of your company’s cybersecurity program. Different things may appeal to various candidates, and certain strengths may be more beneficial to focus on when finding the right match. For instance, if your security strategy is still in its infancy, seeking a leader who is particularly adept at the planning phase might make more sense. The other two areas to consider include execution and optimization.

Becoming a frontrunner…

Once you’ve got a better idea of what type of CISO would be best suited for your needs and you’ve begun to map out your strategy for the long-term, versus finding a quick-fix, the last step is making your organization stand out as a frontrunner amongst all the other employers vying for your ideal candidate’s attention.

The more established and equipped you are in terms of the value you place on cybersecurity (i.e. showing commitment to investing in the best tools and technology, such as automated incident response, etc.), the more attractive your offer will become and the more likely you’ll be to win over the expert you’ve got in your crosshairs.EBOOK: HOW TO MEASURE IT PROCESS AUTOMATION RETURN ON INVESTMENT (ROI)

5 Signs You’re About to Become a Victim of a Cybersecurity Breach

5 Signs You’re About to Become a Victim of a Cybersecurity BreachIt doesn’t take a whole lot of digging to uncover the disturbing number of successful cybersecurity breaches that are occurring (and at a mind-boggling rate). In fact, it seems there’s news breaking almost daily indicating that a high-profile organization has once again fallen victim to savvy criminals to the detriment of clients, employees, partners and other stakeholders. The best way to avoid becoming the latest headline is to be proactive, and knowing what to watch for can help you stay a step ahead of the curve. That being said, here are five signs your organization is at risk of experiencing a cybersecurity incident.

You don’t have buy-in across the board.

We’ve said it time and time again, but it’s so important that it’s worth repeating yet again: cybersecurity is everyone’s job. It’ s not just the IT team who should be concerned about keeping sensitive company data out of the hands of hackers. Thankfully making cybersecurity a company-wide initiative isn’t a huge ordeal, provided you take the right approach. (Here are a few tips that might help.)

You don’t fully understand your company’s cybersecurity risk posture.

The risk posture of your organization refers to its overall cybersecurity strength. In other words, how vulnerable are you to outside threats? Whether it’s that you’re failing to perform ongoing assessments, you’re not examining the right areas, you’re taking the wrong approaches or you’re simply not using the right cybersecurity tools, if you are discounting the amount of this risk, you are leaving yourself much more open to potential attacks.

Your policies are well-documented but lack true substance.

Your IT team may have spent hours, days or weeks developing cybersecurity policies and best practices, but if those plans are not robust enough, they won’t do you much good in the event of a security incident. A strong, effective infosec policy should be comprehensive and properly supported by the right technology, tools and technology.

You’re approach to cybersecurity is reactive rather than proactive.

If you are waiting until a breach occurs before addressing it, you are already behind the eight ball in terms of risk and potential losses. To the contrary, organizations that take a more proactive approach to cybersecurity by implementing tools like automation for better incident management are able to stay a few steps ahead of their adversaries and therefore avoid becoming a victim.

You’re not placing a strong enough emphasis on remediation and recovery.

Effective incident management emphasizes the critical importance of remediation after the fact. Like it or not, the occasional cybersecurity threat will make its way into your network undetected. The speed and effectiveness with which your organization responds to that threat could mean the difference between a minor setback and a devastating loss. This is another reason having the right tools and technology in place is so important. The faster you can isolate a breach, the better you will be able to mitigate damages. Likewise, the more you invest in the remediation process, the more effective you can make your future cybersecurity policies and procedures.

Is your organization at a greater risk of becoming a victim of a security breach? Start turning things around today by launching your free trial of Ayehu’s automation and orchestration platform. The more proactive you are, the safer your company will become.How to Get Critical Systems Back Online in Minutes

5 Ways to Boost Your Cybersecurity without Breaking the Bank

5 Ways to Boost Your Cybersecurity without Breaking the BankToday’s cybersecurity threats come in many different forms. Whether it’s social engineering, phishing, ransomware or more complex and dangerous advanced persistent threats, one thing is for certain. Organizations of every size must take the appropriate measures to protect their sensitive data and prevent it from falling into the wrong hands.

Unfortunately, what’s standing in the way of many companies, however, is the topic of cost. Thankfully there are simple yet effective things you can do to keep your network secure regardless of budgetary limitations.

Proactively identify and address vulnerabilities.

The bad guys can’t get to you if you get to your own problems before they have a chance. Implementing a cybersecurity policy that involves ongoing testing to identify areas of potential vulnerability and taking the necessary steps to patch these holes in advance is the key. Staying on top of trends and industry news as it relates to widespread issues can also help you stay a few steps ahead of would-be hackers.

Take advantage of upgrades.

Many people don’t realize that their basic cybersecurity tools, such as antivirus software and firewall protection come with free upgrades. Take some time to go over the technology you’ve already got in place, that you’ve already paid for, and see if there are new features or enhancements that you might be missing out on. Investing a small amount of time into doing research can go long way toward preventing a potential security breach.

Develop a company-wide cybersecurity plan.

If your company lacks a defined cybersecurity strategy or the plan you currently have in place isn’t tied in with your business goals, you could be inadvertently placing yourself at a greater risk than necessary. Such a well-defined strategy does not require a large expense, either. To begin, gather a few key decision makers together for a brainstorming session and collectively answer the following questions:

  • What are our business goals/objectives?
  • What are the risks associated with those goals/objectives?
  • What type of data exists within the IT environment?
  • What tools and technologies are already available to protect that data?
  • What new tools and technologies can we obtain to strengthen our defense and that fit within our budget?

Educate employees.

The best way to approach cybersecurity, particularly when you’re dealing with limited funds and resources, is to acknowledge that it’s everyone’s job – not just IT. From the executive offices down to the frontline workers and everyone in between – every single employee should know what to look out for and what steps should be taken in the event of a potential security breach. Make ongoing education and training a priority.

Be careful with BYOD.

Smaller firms often find it beneficial to allow employees to utilize their own personal devices in order to reduce equipment expenditure. While this certainly has the potential to be a cost-effective solution, it’s critically important that the appropriate cybersecurity measures are put in place to address the increased risk of security incidents. Develop and implement thorough BYOD policies, processes and procedures and conduct regular audits to ensure employee compliance at all times.

Additionally, companies would be wise to consider investing in tools like automated incident response, which can bridge the gap created by limited IT personnel and other resources and create a much more robust and highly effective cybersecurity defense strategy.Ayehu’s automation and orchestration platform offers out-of-the-box, plug-and-play features at an attractive price point that might just surprise you.

Give it a try today FREE for 30 days or contact us to schedule a free product demo.

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

5 Benefits of Remote Monitoring

5 Benefits of Remote MonitoringDid you now that the average amount of downtime businesses experience is around 87 hours? Furthermore, it is estimated that for every hour of downtime, the cost averages out at around $84,000. Can your company afford to lose that much revenue every time a problem occurs with your network? Remote monitoring allows your IT team to stay on top of incidents from wherever they are and uses automation to fill in the gaps. Here are five specific advantages of investing in remote network monitoring.

Limit Downtime

As mentioned, even just a few moments of downtime can be incredibly costly to a business. Not only can it result in a direct loss of revenue, but it can also impact your company indirectly due to loss of customer trust. Internally, downtime affects productivity and morale because it impedes employees’ ability to do their jobs.

By implementing remote monitoring and IT automation, your servers will be on watch 24/7 so that the moment a potential problem arises it can either be resolved automatically or escalated and addressed remotely. This can dramatically reduce the amount of time systems are inaccessible and in many cases prevent network downtime from occurring in the first place.

Enhance Security

These days, cybersecurity is among the highest priorities for businesses. It is absolutely imperative that companies take the proper measures to keep sensitive data secure and prevent it from ending up in the wrong hands. Security breaches can wreak havoc, both financially as well as to your hard-earned reputation. It can also contribute to increased downtime, which as we’ve already mentioned is also very costly.

When systems can be automatically monitored around the clock, threats can be more quickly detected, identified, analyzed, prioritized and dealt with accordingly. Those incidents that can be remediated without human intervention will be resolved automatically while those that require human input can be addressed by the appropriate party either via SMS, IM, email or phone. This significantly decreases the chances of your company’s sensitive data becoming compromised.

Lower Total Cost of Ownership

Any IT manager knows all too well how quickly TCO can add up. Between the initial investment in and ongoing maintenance of hardware and software, and all the expenses that go along with recruiting, hiring, training and retaining staff, it all takes a toll on your company’s bottom line. While there are, of course, certain costs associated with implementing automation, the added benefit of remote monitoring can help offset much of the overall TCO by enabling staff to work on the network and systems at a more predictable rate.

Streamline Maintenance

It’s of critical importance that all systems, programs and applications are well-maintained and kept up-to-date with any updates, patches, security and overall health checks. When your network is properly maintained, your business will continue to run smoothly. But keeping up with this demanding task can be challenging, particularly for IT departments that are working with limited resources, either financially or staff-wise. Remote monitoring keeps track of the status of all of your technology to ensure that any issues that arise are promptly addressed.

Improve Productivity

Another great benefit of leveraging remote monitoring is that it increases internal productivity, not only by reducing downtime and therefore allowing employees to consistently perform their job duties without interruption, but also in terms of IT operations.

With automation, manual tasks and workflows can be shifted from human to machine, freeing up talented personnel to focus their skills elsewhere. Additionally, since your systems and network will be continuously monitored regardless of staff location, you improve service levels and ultimately grow your business.

Ready to learn more about how remote monitoring can revolutionize how your IT department is run? Try it free for 30 days. Click here to start your trial today.

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How to Create an Effective Information Security Policy

How to Create an Effective Information Security Policy

The cornerstone of any good cybersecurity strategy is a formal policy with the purpose of protecting sensitive information from falling into the wrong hands. It should, at the very least, reflect the overall security objectives of the organization as well as include details on the agreed-upon strategy for managing and securing company information.

Beyond this, however, figuring out what other material should be included in a policy of such high importance can be challenging. To clarify, we’ve narrowed down some of the basics of a strong, effective infosec policy.

 

Scope – List and address any and all information covered, including systems, programs, networks, data, facilities and all users within the organization.

Info Classification – Definitions that are as specific as possible. Avoid blanket terms like “restricted” or “confidential” unless they are used as part of detailed statements.

Goals – Define the objectives for secure information handling for each info classification category (i.e. regulatory, contractual, legal, etc.) Ex.: “prevent asset loss,” or “customer privacy prohibits access to customer data for anyone except authorized representatives and only for the purpose of customer communication.”

Context – Defines policy placement within the context of other managerial directives, along with supplemental documentation (i.e. “agreed upon by all parties at executive level” or “all additional information handling must be consistent with…”)

Supporting Documentation – Incorporate any relevant references to supporting documents, specifically as they apply to cybersecurity processes, roles and responsibilities, technology standards, guidelines and procedures.

Instructions – Delve into specific instructions related to already established company-wide security mandates (i.e. network/system access requires identity authentication and verification; sharing of individual authentication method is strictly prohibited; etc.)

Responsibilities – Document specific designation of established roles and responsibilities within the organization as they relate to information security (i.e. the IT department is the sole provider of telecom lines, etc.)

Consequences – Outline specific consequences for non-compliance (i.e. “up to and including termination”)

Of course, this policy is meant to be the foundation of your organizational cybersecurity strategy. Once in place, it should be supported and bolstered by implementing the right team, tools and technology. For instance, companies should ensure that IT personnel are well-versed and kept up-to-date on appropriate security measures and arm them with the tools they need, like automation, to help them do their jobs more effectively.

Don’t have the right tools and technology in place yet? The time to hunker down is now. Start your free trial of eyeShare today and make your information security strategy as strong as possible.

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response