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The CAO’s Role in Digital Transformation

The CAO's Role in Digital TransformationToday’s savvy business leaders recognize the need to adapt to changing technology or risk being left behind. And while we may not be able to control what that technology will be or which direction it will take us, we can take advantage by responding quickly and making the necessary adaptations before our competitors. That’s why the role of Chief Automation Officer is becoming much more necessary.

A recent study by PMG revealed that the biggest obstacle to successful adoption of automation was the lack of a holistic approach. In fact, 59 percent of respondents agreed that automation implemented on an ad hoc basis leads to incompatibility and subsequent inefficiency. Most organizations today require not only a unification of silos but also the ability to align automation strategies between different physical locations, some of which may be situated half a world away.

How can one expect to effectively align IT functions with the business as a whole when automation – the very technology that’s designed to enable better business decisions – is not adequately represented in the C-Suite? A CAO brings valuable perspective with the ability to see automation from a global viewpoint. As a result, automation becomes a critical component of the overall strategy rather than just a means to deliver it.

Organizations with multiple technology centers located worldwide recognize the importance of global collaboration to the forward progress of the company. There is little overall business value if you’ve achieved continuous process improvement in just one office but not the others. You may have certain specialists deployed across the globe who are highly skilled at managing automation technology, but if there’s no central strategy and one leader, their abilities cannot be maximized.

The CAO’s purpose is to drive this type of simultaneous widespread orchestration. While automation specialists focus on their specific IT departments, managing the day to day operations, the Chief Automation Officer spends his or her time looking outward and forward. This role is absolutely essential to achieving rapid, sustainable transformation, as the ability to orchestrate automation on a global scale and unify strategies is what ultimately enables businesses to adapt at the speed of thought.

Automation is critical to an organization’s ability to reallocate capital from today’s business operations to the needs of tomorrow. It allows IT to shift from reactively putting out fires to taking a more proactive approach, which is necessary for successful digital transformation.

The good news is automation is evolving at relatively the same pace as the complexity it is designed to simplify. Disruption that would otherwise be overwhelming is now becoming entirely feasible thanks to automation and orchestration solutions that provide a competitive edge. Deriving business value from the IoT, for instance, is made possible by automation strategies that process and analyze the data being procured. Automation essentially frees up funds that can then be used to fuel innovation.

The CAO is responsible for taking optimized workflows and applying them wherever feasible throughout the entire organization. This creates more compliant and easily auditable processes. And because this approach eliminates repetition and duplication of work, the entire operation can run more consistently and efficiently. Furthermore, by evaluating how automation is utilized throughout the company, the CAO is also able to optimize the allocation of human resources, removing bottlenecks and improving productivity across the enterprise.

Another area where the CAO can be highly beneficial to the company is in his or her ability to seek inspiration from the rest of the workforce. One company was able to uncover nearly 300 innovative ideas simply by asking employees to suggest processes to automate. In the absence of this communication between upper management and frontline workers, these suggestions, and the positive changes they brought about, would have remained private.

In conclusion, automation remains a catalyst for change, driver of innovation and procurer of productivity. With the overarching visibility and control a CAO provides, automation strategies will have the flexibility and scope needed to stimulate disruption and achieve digital transformation.

Want to see the power of automation and orchestration powered by machine learning in action? Click here to request a product demo.

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Should you hire a Chief Automation Officer?

If you were to ask any high-level executive about IT, you would almost always receive an answer that centers around the need for innovation. But while most in leadership roles openly profess the importance of innovating, getting them to actually free up the resources and make the necessary investments is much more challenging. This is where automation comes into play, and the aptly named Chief Automation Officer is leading this charge.

Business Benefits of CAO

A surprising number of enterprises are now recognizing the many benefits employing automation can afford, and not just in terms of IT. Nowadays, companies of every size, structure and industry are leveraging automation technology to streamline everything from routine tasks to complex workflows, cyber-security incident response and even self-service support. For those forward-thinking organizations desiring to harness the power of intelligent automation as an overarching business objective, having a central point of contact to organize, oversee and optimize the entire process is strongly recommended.

Challenges and Barriers

For most companies, implementation of automation typically occurs at the department level – at least in the beginning. Because IT is naturally open to and comfortable with such technological advances and innovative concepts, this is the area where most organizations choose to introduce automation. One of the downsides to this is that without the right leadership involvement, IT tends to “own” the process, which can lead to isolation and silos, or as Gartner deems them, “islands of automation.” These “islands” are counterproductive and costly, actually hindering efficiency.

Recent studies have revealed that this lack of a holistic viewpoint has become one of the biggest obstacles of a successful automation strategy. Simply put, ad-hoc automation leads to fragmented operations. This reality has paved the way for the rise of the Chief Automation Officer (CAO) whose goal is to identify the many islands of automation that exist across the organization and effectively connect them. This role is designed to act as a liaison between IT and other key business strategies to develop, implement and manage a more cohesive, efficient enterprise environment.

An Innovative Approach

For obvious reasons, the Chief Automation Officer does not manually work toward these goals, but rather proactively identifies, assesses and leverages the latest in intelligent automation technology, powered by AI and machine learning. The appropriate tools will be implemented to streamline not only IT operations, but as many other offices, departments and teams across the entire organization as possible. Instead of siloed automation, the CAO works toward the overarching goal of achieving unity and cohesion.

Beyond the technology piece of the puzzle, the Chief Automation Officer is also typically tasked with helping to achieve greater human resource allocation. By assessing the company’s needs as a whole instead of just interdepartmentally, the CAO can determine how best to utilize manpower, strategically and systematically implementing automation across the entire enterprise to eliminate costly bottlenecks and dramatically improve workforce productivity.

The Ideal Balance

It should be noted that the CAO’s purpose is not to replace workers with robots, but rather supply the available tools to make the jobs of humans easier and more efficient. As a result, human-centric automation facilitates a significant shift of manual, repetitive tasks and workflows from human to machine, freeing up knowledge workers to focus their valuable skills on more business-critical tasks and projects, hence achieving greater innovation.

In reality, at least for the time being, not every organization will require a designated Chief Automation Officer. However, as we continue to drive forward, embracing and employing the many advances that technology has in store, this need will continue to grow.

Could your company benefit from a CAO? Perhaps the best place to begin is with the right tool. Get started with a free product demo of Ayehu and see for yourself how automation can bring your business to the next level.

EBOOK: HOW TO MEASURE IT PROCESS AUTOMATION RETURN ON INVESTMENT (ROI)

The Role of Chief Automation Officer in Digital Transformation

Today’s savvy business leaders recognize the need to adapt to changing technology or risk being left behind. And while we may not be able to control what that technology will be or which direction it will take us, we can take advantage by responding quickly and making the necessary adaptations before our competitors. That’s why the role of Chief Automation Officer is becoming much more necessary.

A recent study by PMG revealed that the biggest obstacle to successful adoption of automation was the lack of a holistic approach. In fact, 59 percent of respondents agreed that automation implemented on an ad hoc basis leads to incompatibility and subsequent inefficiency. Most organizations today require not only a unification of silos but also the ability to align automation strategies between different physical locations, some of which may be situated half a world away.

How can one expect to effectively align IT functions with the business as a whole when automation – the very technology that’s designed to enable better business decisions – is not adequately represented in the C-Suite? A CAO brings valuable perspective with the ability to see automation from a global viewpoint. As a result, automation becomes a critical component of the overall strategy rather than just a means to deliver it.

Organizations with multiple technology centers located worldwide recognize the importance of globaThe Role of Chief Automation Officer in Digital Transformationl collaboration to the forward progress of the company. There is little overall business value if you’ve achieved continuous process improvement in just one office but not the others. You may have certain specialists deployed across the globe who are highly skilled at managing automation technology, but if there’s no central strategy and one leader, their abilities cannot be maximized.

The CAO’s purpose is to drive this type of simultaneous widespread orchestration. While automation specialists focus on their specific IT departments, managing the day to day operations, the Chief Automation Officer spends his or her time looking outward and forward. This role is absolutely essential to achieving rapid, sustainable transformation, as the ability to orchestrate automation on a global scale and unify strategies is what ultimately enables businesses to adapt at the speed of thought.

Automation is critical to an organization’s ability to reallocate capital from today’s business operations to the needs of tomorrow. It allows IT to shift from reactively putting out fires to taking a more proactive approach, which is necessary for successful digital transformation.

The good news is automation is evolving at relatively the same pace as the complexity it is designed to simplify. Disruption that would otherwise be overwhelming is now becoming entirely feasible thanks to automation and orchestration solutions that provide a competitive edge. Deriving business value from the IoT, for instance, is made possible by automation strategies that process and analyze the data being procured. Automation essentially frees up funds that can then be used to fuel innovation.

The CAO is responsible for taking optimized workflows and applying them wherever feasible throughout the entire organization. This creates more compliant and easily auditable processes. And because this approach eliminates repetition and duplication of work, the entire operation can run more consistently and efficiently. Furthermore, by evaluating how automation is utilized throughout the company, the CAO is also able to optimize the allocation of human resources, removing bottlenecks and improving productivity across the enterprise.

Another area where the CAO can be highly beneficial to the company is in his or her ability to seek inspiration from the rest of the workforce. One company was able to uncover nearly 300 innovative ideas simply by asking employees to suggest processes to automate. In the absence of this communication between upper management and frontline workers, these suggestions, and the positive changes they brought about, would have remained private.

In conclusion, automation remains a catalyst for change, driver of innovation and procurer of productivity. With the overarching visibility and control a CAO provides, automation strategies will have the flexibility and scope needed to stimulate disruption and achieve digital transformation.

Want to see the power of automation and orchestration powered by machine learning in action? Click here to request a product demo.

IT Process Automation Survival Guide

Why You Should Hire a Chief Automation Officer

This article was written by Marg. Bruineman and published on BenefitsCanada.com. See original here.

Why You Should Hire a Chief Automation OfficerWith the wave of robotics and artificial intelligence anticipated to wash over the workplace, keeping pace with it all could require the attention of a dedicated, high-level individual. Given the breadth of the expected changes, some people are touting the idea of having a chief automation officer to oversee the burgeoning area of artificial intelligence.

The role of a chief automation officer could include responsibility for areas such as understanding and applying new automation processes as they become available; leveraging automation to streamline information technology processes; and examining the opportunities as part of an overall automation strategy.

A growing need

Given the rapid changes expected in the coming years, Gabby Nizri, chief executive officer of Tel Avivbased information technology process automation provider Ayehu Software Technologies Ltd., foresees automation filling such an important role that he envisions it occupying a position at the executive level.

“As automation becomes an integral part of the organization’s infrastructure management process, it is highly likely that the role of the CAO will become more commonplace, eventually ranking up there with the rise of other C-level titles, like that of chief digital officer,” says Nizri.

Artificial intelligence, of course, has the potential to affect a range of industries, including the benefits sector itself. In the last few years, Jean-Philippe Provost, leader of Mercer’s retirement practice in Canada, has noticed automation occupying a larger role when it comes to leveraging all of the new information that’s becoming available in the age of big data. As a result, he can see the possibilities for a chief automation officer in the insurance and benefits sector.

“What’s really powerful about a position like this one is it’s really understanding what are the tools available to enable them to process that information in a way to determine what version of a medical plan would make more sense for an employee, whether or not they should elect for dental coverage,” he says, noting the result would be a more logical decision-making process instead of a purely emotional one.

Widespread applications

Among the companies already pushing the automation envelope in the insurance industry is Symbility Solutions Inc. It recently obtained a patent for automatic fraud detection software in its mobile health claims application. According to Symbility’s Paul Crowe, the software reviews the claims for any indications of fraud, such as alterations.

The idea is to automate both the back and front ends so the process is smooth for users as well. “That’s what’s important in looking at automation. If you can automate both sides — the customer experience as well as the business experience — through technology, that’s where the sweet spot exists,” says Crowe.

“The automation process that I think is really happening and is going to be happening in health benefits and the larger insurance world . . . is going to increase at a more rapid pace in the next handful of years.”



How to Get Critical Systems Back Online in Minutes




Analyzing the Need for a Chief Automation Officer

Analyzing the Need for a Chief Automation OfficerIf you were to ask any high-level executive about IT, you would almost always receive an answer that centers around the need for innovation. But while most in leadership roles openly profess the importance of innovating, getting them to actually free up the resources and make the necessary investments is much more challenging. This is where automation comes into play, and the so-called Chief Automation Officer is leading this charge.

A surprising number of enterprises are now recognizing the many benefits employing automation can afford, and not just in terms of IT. Nowadays, companies of every size, structure and industry are leveraging automation technology to streamline everything from routine tasks to complex workflows, cyber-security incident response and even self-service support. For those forward-thinking organizations desiring to harness the power of automation as an overarching business objective, having a central point of contact to organize, oversee and optimize the entire process is strongly recommended.

For most companies, implementation of automation typically occurs at the department level – at least in the beginning. Because IT is naturally open to and comfortable with such technological advances and innovative concepts, this is the area where most organizations choose to introduce automation. One of the downsides to this is that without the right leadership involvement, IT tends to “own” the process, which can lead to isolation and silos, or as Gartner deems them, “islands of automation.” These “islands” are counterproductive and costly, actually hindering efficiency.

Recent studies have revealed that this lack of a holistic viewpoint has become one of the biggest obstacles of a successful automation strategy. Simply put, ad-hoc automation leads to fragmented operations. This reality has paved the way for the rise of the Chief Automation Officer (CAO) whose goal is to identify the many islands of automation that exist across the organization and effectively connect them. This role is designed to act as a liaison between IT and other key business strategies to develop, implement and manage a more cohesive, efficient enterprise environment.

For obvious reasons, the Chief Automation Officer does not manually work toward these goals, but rather proactively identifies, assesses and leverages the latest in automation technology. The appropriate tools will be implemented to streamline not only IT operations, but as many other offices, departments and teams across the entire organization as possible. Instead of siloed automation, the CAO works toward the overarching goal of achieving unity and cohesion.

Beyond the technology piece of the puzzle, the Chief Automation Officer is also typically tasked with helping to achieve greater human resource allocation. By assessing the company’s needs as a whole instead of just interdepartmentally, the CAO can determine how best to utilize manpower, strategically and systematically implementing automation across the entire enterprise to eliminate costly bottlenecks and dramatically improve workforce productivity.

It should be noted that the CAO’s purpose is not to replace workers with computers, but rather supply the available tools to make the jobs of humans easier and more efficient. As a result, human-centric automation facilitates a significant shift of manual, repetitive tasks and workflows from human to machine, freeing up knowledge workers to focus their valuable skills on more business-critical tasks and projects, hence achieving greater innovation.

In reality, at least for the time being, not every organization will require a designated Chief Automation Officer. However, as we continue to drive forward, embracing and employing the many advances that technology has in store, this need will continue to grow.

Could your company benefit from a CAO? Perhaps the best place to begin is with the right tool. Download your free trial of eyeShare and see for yourself how automation can bring your business to the next level.





EBOOK: HOW TO MEASURE IT PROCESS AUTOMATION RETURN ON INVESTMENT (ROI)