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How to Strengthen Your Cybersecurity Resilience

How to Strengthen Your Cybersecurity ResilienceOrganizations in every industry and across the entire world are deeply entrenched in the battle to prevent a security breach. Thankfully there are specific steps security teams can take that will improve their cybersecurity resilience so they can better manage the barrage of threats that are inevitably going to continue. Let’s take a closer look at what this so-called resilience really is and how you can strengthen yours to improve your ability to manage, mitigate and recover from cyber-attacks.

Cybersecurity Resilience Defined

The Ponemon Institute defines cybersecurity resilience as “the capacity of an enterprise to maintain its core purpose and integrity in the face of cyber-attacks.” More specifically, a company’s cybersecurity resilience can be viewed as the place where prevention, detection and response to cyber incidents align. A resilient organization is one that is capable of preventing, detecting, containing and – most importantly – recovering from various threats against its data, network and IT infrastructure.

Why Cybersecurity Resilience is Critically Important

These days, there is no company that is safe from becoming a victim of a cyber-attack. It’s no longer a question of “if” a security incident will occur, but rather “when.” As such, it’s of critical importance that IT personnel (and, frankly, everyone else within an organization) be well prepared to battle against these inevitable attacks. And as cyber-attacks continue to increase in number and complexity, boasting solid cybersecurity resilience will become more important than ever before.

Bringing Things Together

Unfortunately, the increasing complexity of IT and general business processes has created a new barrier to effective cybersecurity resilience. In fact, according to recent studies, this complexity has become the second largest obstacle to cyber resilience, with insufficient planning and lack of adequate preparedness being first.

One of the main causes of these so-called complexities is the fact that many organizations have a multitude of individual IT and security tools, applications and processes in place, each operating independently. With so many fragmented tools and processes but no actual standardized system to manage it all, these companies are left vulnerable to the risk of cyber-attacks.

What’s needed is a universal platform that leverages advanced automation and orchestration technology to bring everything together, create a unified system and effectively fight fire with fire.

Keys to Improving Cybersecurity Resilience

Improving your organization’s cybersecurity resilience requires buy-in and cooperation from the top down. It’s much more than just getting the approval to invest in the right tool or implementing the appropriate technology. Cybersecurity is everyone’s job, and it starts at the top. To be effective, security must become more than just a topic or something IT handles. It must become ingrained as part of the company’s underlying culture.

Becoming cybersecurity resilient isn’t an easy task. It takes a true effort to bring together the necessary technology with the people at the helm. Provided the executives of the company are committed and the appropriate tools are put in place, the organization will ultimately develop the strength and resiliency it needs to withstand any attack that comes its way.

Ready to leverage technology to strengthen your enterprise’s cybersecurity resiliency? Start today by downloading your free 30 day trial of Ayehu’s automation and orchestration platform.

 

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Who are Cyber Criminals Targeting and How?

Who are Cyber Criminals Targeting and How?Verizon recently released its annual Data Breach Investigations Report, a comprehensive resource that is based on analysis of over 40,000 incidents, including 1,935 confirmed data breaches. As one might imagine, with this much data, the report itself can be somewhat overwhelming. We thought it would be helpful to summarize what we feel is one of the most critical messages, at least from a cybersecurity in business perspective. That is – defining who is most likely to be targeted by cyber criminals and what tactics they’re using to achieve their malicious goals. Here’s what you need to know.

Who are the most common victims of cybersecurity attacks?

The Verizon report uncovered that the industries most frequently targeted by hackers were as follows:

  • 24% of breaches affected financial organizations
  • 15% of breaches involved healthcare organizations
  • 12% Public sector entities
  • 15% Retail and Accommodation combined

It’s pretty obvious why cyber criminals would target financial and healthcare institutions, since these organizations deal very heavily in confidential information. Not surprisingly, the report found that 73% of breaches were financially motivated. Public sector is a rather interesting area, though some of this could be related to hacktivism, a type of cyber-crime that’s been steadily on the rise. Retail and other types of accommodation organizations also handle a good deal of customer data, particularly as it relates to financial and personal identification material.

What methods are cyber-attackers using?

There are a wide variety of techniques a cyber-criminal might use to access the information he or she is after. According to the report, here are the most common:

  • 62% of breaches featured hacking (81% of hacking-related breaches leveraged either stolen and/or weak passwords)
  • 51% over half of breaches included malware
  • 43% were social attacks
  • 14% were due to errors
  • 14% as a result of privilege misuse
  • 8% were caused by physical actions

The truly alarming fact here is that hacking can come in many different forms. There are basic hacks and then there are those orchestrated by highly sophisticated cyber criminals. These are more commonly referred to as Advanced Persistent Threats, or APTs. In these instances, the actors behind the attacks are absolutely relentless. They also strategically target their victims to increase the odds of achieving the end result they’re after.

It should also be noted that the number of social engineering attacks is also on the rise. This can be tied into malware, as techniques like phishing scams typically involve the deployment of some type of malicious code. In fact, the report also found that 66% of malware was installed via malicious email attachments.

What you need to know…

The most important thing we’d like to point out is that even those organizations that fall outside the main categories of cybersecurity targets should operate under the assumption and expectation that they will likely also become a victim at some point. In other words, no company is safe. Small businesses to enterprise level, and organizations in every industry across the globe are all at risk of becoming a target of cyber-criminals.

The best way to defend against these threats is to leverage the power of technology that is available to you. Remember – attacks are coming in at an alarming rate and increasing in both volume and complexity. Likewise, tools like anti-virus software and firewalls are no match for sophisticated social engineering campaigns. A combination of employee education and automated cybersecurity incident response can provide an extra barrier of protection. It can also help with the most important step – remediation – getting critical systems back up and running quickly and mitigating damages.

Want to avoid becoming a part of the disturbing statistics listed above? Arm your company with the right technology. Launch your free 30 day trial of eyeShare and start beefing up your protection today.

 

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

5 Ways to Strengthen Your Organization’s Cybersecurity Risk Posture

5 Ways to Strengthen Your Organization’s Cybersecurity Risk PostureA company’s risk posture refers to its overarching cybersecurity plan – that is, its approach to keeping sensitive data safe from internal and external threats. This includes everything from proactive planning and prevention to implementation, management and remediation strategy. No company – large or small – is immune to a potential security breach, which means every single organization in business today should develop and maintain a strong, comprehensive risk posture. Could your strategy use a little help?

Here are five simple ways you can beef up your protection and improve where your company stands against cyber threats.

Lead by Example – Business owners and managers must take the topic of cybersecurity very serious if they want frontline employees to follow suit. The fact is, keeping data safe is everyone’s job, but leading by example is an important way to ensure that everyone across the board views security as the top priority it truly is.

Invest in Education – When we discuss the topic of cybersecurity, the vision most often conjured up is that of a sophisticated hacker, but in reality, internal parties are often the greatest risk to a company’s data security. That’s why it’s so important to invest in ongoing training to ensure that all employees understand how to keep information safe, how to spot and avoid potential incidents and what their role is in the company’s overall approach.

Close the Loop – One of the biggest problems with many companies’ risk postures today is that they are incomplete. That is, they may have invested heavily into monitoring, but have forgotten the other side of the coin, which is response and remediation. Much of the damage from a successful breach comes in the time it takes to identify and resolve the problem. Technology, like automated cybersecurity incident response, ensures you cover all your bases, reducing resolution time and mitigating damages.

Learn from the Past – A great indicator of future events is what has happened in the past. Successful breaches can become valuable learning tools to help identify and address vulnerabilities and develop stronger security practices for the future.

Test and Optimize – Cybersecurity is not a ‘set it and forget it’ task. Hackers and other sophisticated criminals are constantly honing their craft and leveraging newer and better tools and technology to achieve their unsavory goals. The only way to keep up is to adopt an agile approach to security. Testing analyzing and implementing improvements on an ongoing basis will make you better armed to go toe-to-toe with would be attackers.

Is your risk posture strong enough to prevent potentially devastating losses? If not, the time to take action is now. To try Ayehu’s cybersecurity automation platform FREE for 30 days, simply click here.

 

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Managing Cybersecurity in a Multi-Generational Workplace

While Millennials are slowly but surely beginning to take over the workplace, there are still plenty of workers from older generations infiltrating modern offices across the globe. In fact, many of the higher-up positions, such as c-suite executive roles, are currently held by individuals from Gen-X and even a few Baby Boomers still hanging on. Likewise, generation Z will slowly begin to make their way into the workforce over the coming years.

Managing operations across multiple generations can be difficult in and of itself, and the topic of cybersecurity is no exception. It’s especially challenging given the fact that each group of workers has their own experience, beliefs and opinions surrounding how to keep data secure. If your organization happens to be home to a diverse age range of employees, here are a few tips for making cybersecurity something everyone can universally maintain.

Bridging the Gap

One of the biggest issues with developing a multi-generational cybersecurity policy is the different experiences each group brings to the table. For instance, while it may be easy to incorporate security training into the new employee onboarding process, getting older workers – particularly those who are less tech-savvy – on board and supportive of cybersecurity initiatives isn’t always so easy. As a result, different types of training and educational programs might be needed based on each demographic.

A Glaring IssueManaging Cybersecurity in a Multi-Generational Workplace

To further illustrate the challenge security professionals face when dealing with a workforce from various age groups, a joint study was conducted by Citrix and the Ponemon Institute, which revealed the following:

  • 55% of respondents said that Millennials (born between 1981 and 1997) pose the greatest risk of circumventing IT security policies and use of unapproved apps in the workplace.
  • 33% said Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) are the most susceptible to phishing and social engineering scams.
  • 30% said Gen Xers (born from 1965 to 1980) were most likely to exhibit carelessness in following an organization’s security policies.

Each of these eye-opening facts must be taken into account when developing cybersecurity training and implementing organizational policies.

Tapping into Technology

Another great way to help bring different generations together to support the common goal of enhanced cybersecurity is to leverage as much technology as possible. For instance, by deploying monitoring software and integrating it with an automation and orchestration platform for enhanced incident response, technology can do much of the heavy lifting, alleviating the burden on human workers. This can help reluctant individuals to view the importance of security in a more positive light.

Universal Education is Key

It’s important to point out that while each generation may have its own mindset about security issues, there are also certain universal truths that should be taught regardless of age group. Keep in mind that hackers rarely know precisely who they are targeting. Their goal is to simply achieve their end result as quickly and easily as possible, regardless of who might be on the receiving end. Likewise, it’s important not to assume that an employee is inherently aware that they are putting the organization at risk simply because he or she is from a particular generation. As such, universal education must be a priority.

Communicate Clearly and Often

As a more tech-savvy generation makes its way into the workplace, security professionals will have the additional challenge of bringing new employees up to speed and ensuring that they fully comprehend the implications of keeping sensitive data secure. While these younger workers may be more comfortable with technology, it doesn’t necessarily mean they have a realistic understanding of how to protect the information they’re accessing and sharing. Expectations should be clearly communicated early and often to ensure optimum compliance.

What challenges has your organization had to deal with in terms of maintaining maximum cybersecurity across multiple generations of workers? Please share in the comments below!

 

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

How to Land a Skilled CISO

In today’s ever-evolving threat landscape, the role of Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) has never been more critical – especially for larger enterprises. As such, these in-demand executives have become a hot commodity, with companies clamoring to attract, hire – and most importantly – retain a skilled cybersecurity leader of their own. What’s the secret to success? Well, while there’s certainly no magic formula, there are a few key considerations that might just help your firm stand out as the ideal option for landing that talented security expert you’ve been after.

Breaking it all down…

Hiring a great CISO is a two-part process. First, your organization is tasked with locating the ideal person for the job. This part is relatively easy, because it’s something that you can control to some degree. Your hiring manager (CEO, board of directors – or whoever is tasked with filling executive roles) can search sites like LinkedIn and any of the selection of career boards to locate candidates that possess the skillsets and experience you’re seeking.

The second part of the process isn’t quite as straightforward because it involves a decision on the part of the candidates you’re courting. As mentioned, CISOs and other skilled cybersecurity professionals are in high demand today, which meanHow to Land a Skilled CISOs it’s a job seekers marketplace and probably will be for some time now. These experts have their pick of employers from which to choose. It’s up to you to demonstrate effectively why your organization is the right choice, and this is no easy feat.

One of the biggest challenges companies seeking to hire a CISO face is showing candidates that they’re approaching the hiring decision from the right perspective. Unfortunately, many companies don’t jump at bringing in a cybersecurity expert unless and until they’ve experienced some type of crisis – usually a major security breach. If you are among these organizations looking for a quick fix to your security woes, don’t expect the industries top talent to be chomping at the bit to join your team.

The best way to win over a qualified candidate for the job is to do so during normal business operations, as this is a long-term strategy that will benefit both parties. The key is to view this hire as filling an overarching need within your company. After all, effective cybersecurity isn’t something reactive, but rather a proactive and ongoing function within the business. Just as a CFO is there to oversee the continuous accounting activities of the company, the CISO should be a part of managing everyday operations of your security team, not just put out fires that already occurred.

Different strokes for different folks…

An important thing to consider when searching for a CISO to bring onboard is the current status of your company’s cybersecurity program. Different things may appeal to various candidates, and certain strengths may be more beneficial to focus on when finding the right match. For instance, if your security strategy is still in its infancy, seeking a leader who is particularly adept at the planning phase might make more sense. The other two areas to consider include execution and optimization.

Becoming a frontrunner…

Once you’ve got a better idea of what type of CISO would be best suited for your needs and you’ve begun to map out your strategy for the long-term, versus finding a quick-fix, the last step is making your organization stand out as a frontrunner amongst all the other employers vying for your ideal candidate’s attention.

The more established and equipped you are in terms of the value you place on cybersecurity (i.e. showing commitment to investing in the best tools and technology, such as automated incident response, etc.), the more attractive your offer will become and the more likely you’ll be to win over the expert you’ve got in your crosshairs.EBOOK: HOW TO MEASURE IT PROCESS AUTOMATION RETURN ON INVESTMENT (ROI)

5 Signs You’re About to Become a Victim of a Cybersecurity Breach

5 Signs You’re About to Become a Victim of a Cybersecurity BreachIt doesn’t take a whole lot of digging to uncover the disturbing number of successful cybersecurity breaches that are occurring (and at a mind-boggling rate). In fact, it seems there’s news breaking almost daily indicating that a high-profile organization has once again fallen victim to savvy criminals to the detriment of clients, employees, partners and other stakeholders. The best way to avoid becoming the latest headline is to be proactive, and knowing what to watch for can help you stay a step ahead of the curve. That being said, here are five signs your organization is at risk of experiencing a cybersecurity incident.

You don’t have buy-in across the board.

We’ve said it time and time again, but it’s so important that it’s worth repeating yet again: cybersecurity is everyone’s job. It’ s not just the IT team who should be concerned about keeping sensitive company data out of the hands of hackers. Thankfully making cybersecurity a company-wide initiative isn’t a huge ordeal, provided you take the right approach. (Here are a few tips that might help.)

You don’t fully understand your company’s cybersecurity risk posture.

The risk posture of your organization refers to its overall cybersecurity strength. In other words, how vulnerable are you to outside threats? Whether it’s that you’re failing to perform ongoing assessments, you’re not examining the right areas, you’re taking the wrong approaches or you’re simply not using the right cybersecurity tools, if you are discounting the amount of this risk, you are leaving yourself much more open to potential attacks.

Your policies are well-documented but lack true substance.

Your IT team may have spent hours, days or weeks developing cybersecurity policies and best practices, but if those plans are not robust enough, they won’t do you much good in the event of a security incident. A strong, effective infosec policy should be comprehensive and properly supported by the right technology, tools and technology.

You’re approach to cybersecurity is reactive rather than proactive.

If you are waiting until a breach occurs before addressing it, you are already behind the eight ball in terms of risk and potential losses. To the contrary, organizations that take a more proactive approach to cybersecurity by implementing tools like automation for better incident management are able to stay a few steps ahead of their adversaries and therefore avoid becoming a victim.

You’re not placing a strong enough emphasis on remediation and recovery.

Effective incident management emphasizes the critical importance of remediation after the fact. Like it or not, the occasional cybersecurity threat will make its way into your network undetected. The speed and effectiveness with which your organization responds to that threat could mean the difference between a minor setback and a devastating loss. This is another reason having the right tools and technology in place is so important. The faster you can isolate a breach, the better you will be able to mitigate damages. Likewise, the more you invest in the remediation process, the more effective you can make your future cybersecurity policies and procedures.

Is your organization at a greater risk of becoming a victim of a security breach? Start turning things around today by launching your free trial of Ayehu’s automation and orchestration platform. The more proactive you are, the safer your company will become.How to Get Critical Systems Back Online in Minutes

Want to Know How to Keep Your Best Cybersecurity Employees? Automate

Want to Know How to Keep Your Best Cybersecurity Employees? AutomateThere’s much talk about the so-called skills gap in the cybersecurity realm, particularly as it pertains to a lack of qualified staff. What isn’t mentioned quite so often is the fact that because those who are skilled enough to handle the daunting task of enterprise security are in such high demand, the essentially hold all the cards. For IT leaders, it’s not just about attracting the best talent. It’s about keeping them on for the long haul. Given the competitive landscape, this is no easy task. The one ace you can hold in your pocket, however, is automation.

A recent survey revealed that almost half of today’s cybersecurity professionals receive contact from a recruiter or another party regarding a job opening. Those who hold the title of Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) receive five or more such solicitations each and every week. Even more concerning? The same survey indicated that 44% of security professionals are satisfied in their current job. 15% said they aren’t satisfied at all.

This means that if you’ve got even a few employees who are currently unhappy and a plethora of recruiters knocking down their doors on a regular basis, it’s pretty easy to understand why retention in the cybersecurity sector is one of the biggest challenges organizations face today.

Thankfully, you have the ability to turn things around. It starts with providing your IT team with the tools and technologies they need to do their jobs better and more efficiently – in particular, leveraging automation to streamline manual processes like incident response.

Consider for a moment that 92 percent of organizations field 500 or more cyber alerts each and every day. That adds up to around 15,000 alerts per month. This volume of incoming incidents, coupled with inevitable false positives, can easily lead to alert fatigue, especially considering that the average cybersecurity analyst is only capable of accurately handling around ten alerts per day. In other words, without the right tools, your IT team is drowning and you’re probably going to lose them as a result.

To improve employee satisfaction and retention, IT leaders must take the initiative to automate the many manual, tedious tasks and workflows currently bogging down cybersecurity analysts. This significantly lightens the workload while allowing skilled security professionals to apply their expertise to more strategic projects and perform more interesting and meaningful work. These things can dramatically improve morale and satisfaction, which will make it easier for you to keep your best employees.

With the right cybersecurity orchestration and automation platform, your IT analysts could focus on such initiatives as:

  • Proactive threat management. While automation handles incidents that have already occurred, your IT pros can spend their time hunting down potential threats and preparing for them in advance. Being proactive rather than reactive is better for the employee as well as for the organization as a whole.
  • Optimize processes and policies. By eliminating the need for manual incident management, security professionals can work on improving existing policies and developing best practices.
  • Perform routine system and process audits. With the free time automation affords, your IT team can work on reviewing and analyzing other tools, systems, applications and programs that are currently in use and make necessary changes to improve operations.
  • Conduct risk assessments. Automated incident response provides the IT team with the ability to go back to basics, identifying and addressing vulnerabilities and closing any existing gaps in policies and processes.

When it comes to running the most secure, efficient and effective enterprise, retaining top cybersecurity talent is key. The tips and tools listed above should help you keep your IT team happier, more productive and on-board for the long haul so that when recruiters come calling, your employees will gladly send them packing.

To try our next-generation cybersecurity orchestration and automation platform for yourself, simply click here.

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

How to Create an Effective Information Security Policy

How to Create an Effective Information Security Policy

The cornerstone of any good cybersecurity strategy is a formal policy with the purpose of protecting sensitive information from falling into the wrong hands. It should, at the very least, reflect the overall security objectives of the organization as well as include details on the agreed-upon strategy for managing and securing company information.

Beyond this, however, figuring out what other material should be included in a policy of such high importance can be challenging. To clarify, we’ve narrowed down some of the basics of a strong, effective infosec policy.

 

Scope – List and address any and all information covered, including systems, programs, networks, data, facilities and all users within the organization.

Info Classification – Definitions that are as specific as possible. Avoid blanket terms like “restricted” or “confidential” unless they are used as part of detailed statements.

Goals – Define the objectives for secure information handling for each info classification category (i.e. regulatory, contractual, legal, etc.) Ex.: “prevent asset loss,” or “customer privacy prohibits access to customer data for anyone except authorized representatives and only for the purpose of customer communication.”

Context – Defines policy placement within the context of other managerial directives, along with supplemental documentation (i.e. “agreed upon by all parties at executive level” or “all additional information handling must be consistent with…”)

Supporting Documentation – Incorporate any relevant references to supporting documents, specifically as they apply to cybersecurity processes, roles and responsibilities, technology standards, guidelines and procedures.

Instructions – Delve into specific instructions related to already established company-wide security mandates (i.e. network/system access requires identity authentication and verification; sharing of individual authentication method is strictly prohibited; etc.)

Responsibilities – Document specific designation of established roles and responsibilities within the organization as they relate to information security (i.e. the IT department is the sole provider of telecom lines, etc.)

Consequences – Outline specific consequences for non-compliance (i.e. “up to and including termination”)

Of course, this policy is meant to be the foundation of your organizational cybersecurity strategy. Once in place, it should be supported and bolstered by implementing the right team, tools and technology. For instance, companies should ensure that IT personnel are well-versed and kept up-to-date on appropriate security measures and arm them with the tools they need, like automation, to help them do their jobs more effectively.

Don’t have the right tools and technology in place yet? The time to hunker down is now. Start your free trial of eyeShare today and make your information security strategy as strong as possible.

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

7 Ways to Spot a Phishing Scam

7 Ways to Spot a Phishing ScamDid you know that upwards of 85 percent of all organizations today have been victims of some type of phishing attack? And with the average cost of a successful phishing scam ringing in at around $1.6 million, the problem is very real. What’s more, it’s not just everyday employees being targeted. In fact, 1 in 3 companies are routinely attacked in the form of CEO fraud emails.

These statistics should bring to light the critical importance of protecting your organization – regardless of size or industry – against potential malware attacks, and as always, the best defense is a good offense. To prevent your employees (particularly those in the C-suite) from being bested by a hacker, here are things to train them to watch for.

 

Poor Grammar and/or Spelling – One of the first clues that a particular message might have been sent with malicious intent is the quality of the content within. While most monitoring programs successfully filter out most harmful emails, some will inevitably sneak by. A message from an unknown sender containing poor grammar, misspelled words or content that isn’t logical should raise some red flags.

Mismatched URLs – The goal of a phishing campaign is to give the appearance of authenticity in order to convince the recipient that it’s ok to open an attachment or click on an embedded link. In the latter, the URL may look completely legitimate when, in fact, it actually redirects to a malicious site. To avoid this, all employees should be encouraged to hover over URLs to verify that the actual hyperlink matches.

Misleading Domain Names – Another trick many hackers use in phishing scams is to use misleading domain names to make unsuspecting recipients believe a URL is trustworthy. This can easily be identified by how the URL is laid out. For instance, a phishing artist may attempt to trick a victim by creating a child domain with a familiar name, such as Apple and then linking it to a malicious site. The result might be something like: Apple.malicousdomainname.com. Educating employees on how DNS naming structure works can help quickly detect and address any potential fraudulent messages before they are successful.

Requests for Personal Information – Regardless of how official an email may appear, if the message contained within requests personal information, proceed with extreme caution. Remind employees to always take a step back and assess the logic of these types of messages. Banks or credit card companies don’t need customers to provide their account numbers. Likewise, reputable senders will never ask for things like passwords, credit card numbers of anything else that’s confidential in nature.

Unsolicited Contact – If receiving an email filled with lofty promises seems too good to be true, it probably is. Furthermore, if you didn’t do anything to initiate the contact in the first place, it’s almost certainly going to be some type of scam. Any such message should always be regarded with suspicion and great caution.

Messages Containing Threats – While most phishing campaigns lure victims with the promise of enrichment, some hackers resort instead to rely on intimidation tactics to scare recipients into giving up sensitive information. For instance, an email like this might appear to be from a trusted and respected sender, such as a bank or the IRS, and it might contain a message threatening account closure or asset seizure if money or personal information isn’t provided. These types of intimidating messages should raise a red flag.

Something Just Doesn’t Look Right – Last, but certainly not least, intuition can often be enough to flag a potentially harmful email. Teach employees that if they receive a message that gives them pause, for whatever reason, they should trust their gut and escalate it accordingly. After all, it’s always better to be safe than sorry.

Are you doing enough to protect your organization against phishing and other malicious campaigns? Educate your employees on what red flags to watch for and remind them to never click on a link or open an attachment from an unknown or suspicious sender. Then, fortify your cybersecurity incident response strategy with automation.

Click here to start your free 30 day trial today and get the peace of mind you deserve.





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Creating an Effective Cybersecurity Incident Response Plan

There are two common reasons why many organizations today are still failing to properly prepare for possible cyber-attacks. Some companies erroneously believe that the cybersecurity incident response plan they already have in place is sufficient enough to handle threats, while others mistakenly believe they are not at risk of such an attack at all. But given all the recent high-profile breaches, it’s more evident now than ever before that every business must prepare for the inevitable because everyone is at risk. That said, here are a few tips for establishing a highly effective cybersecurity incident response plan that will keep your organization protected from would-be online attacks.

Creating an Effective Cybersecurity Incident Response PlanFirst, you must evaluate and test your existing incident response protocol to determine its current state and identify areas of potential vulnerability. It’s important to not only have a strategy in place but to also check it regularly to ensure that it’s working as it should be. Simulation exercises and penetration tests should be conducted on a regular basis, not only to assess the quality of the IR plan, but to keep personnel prepared for what steps are necessary to address legitimate threats and, if needed, bring systems back online quickly.

An analysis of existing strategies should also include a check of whether the right tools are being leveraged to simplify, consolidate and streamline the overall cybersecurity incident response process. One of the most common issues behind successful security breaches is the fact that IT personnel simply do not have the bandwidth to effectively field the volume of incoming threats. This is how incidents slip in under the radar and wreak havoc. Adding automation into the process can eliminate this problem by allowing technology to identify, validate and prioritize all incoming threats.

Whether your organization happens to have a plan in place that is inadequate or you’ve not yet taken any measures to develop such a plan, the key is first recognizing the risk and ensuring that your systems and strategies are fully tested and properly planned. Additionally, personnel must be brought up to speed and well-versed in situational response. The hurdles of cost and lack of resources can easily be overcome by employing cost-conscious solutions, like integrating an ITPA tool with existing systems to enhance and extend their effectiveness. A combination of advanced, intuitive technology and adequate staff training should do the trick.

The fact is, cyber-attacks can happen at any time and to any business in any industry. How quickly and fully your organization is able to recover from such an attack is directly proportionate to the quality of the cybersecurity incident response plan you have in place. By applying the principles outlined above, you can proactively manage incoming threats and handle incidents in a timely manner, thereby keeping your company’s sensitive data safe from imminent harm and minimizing downtime as much as possible.

Is your cybersecurity incident response plan strong enough to keep your network secure? Could the added benefit of automation improve and enhance its effectiveness? More importantly, can your organization afford to remain vulnerable to dangerous and costly cyber-attacks? Give our IT process automation and orchestration platform a try free for 30 days and start protecting your business today.



eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response