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4 Cybersecurity Trends to Plan for in 2019

It’s that time of year again – a time to reflect on the past while also looking toward, and planning for, the future. As it has been in years past, the topic of cybersecurity will remain at the forefront for business and IT leaders in 2019 and beyond. As attackers continue to become savvier and their assaults more sophisticated, the methods used to defend against them must also continue to evolve. Let’s take a look at four trends that are likely to become the focus of the security industry over the new year.

AI will play a bigger role on both sides of the fence.

As the volume and range of security threats continue to increase, it’s become abundantly clear that the best and only suitable defense will be artificial intelligence. This is especially true since, historically, cyber criminals have access to the same or sometimes even better tools as the security folks. The only truly effective way to combat cyber-attacks in 2019 will be to leverage AI-based security solutions. In other words, organizations must be prepared to fight fire with fire if they are to keep sensitive data safe.

Biometrics will become more widely adopted.

The Face ID feature of Apple’s iPhone X has made facial recognition relatively mainstream. Given the fact that passwords continue to be one of the most vulnerable areas of a business, we can expect to see biometrics become more widely adopted as a safer, more secure alternative. One brand leading the pack is MasterCard who will begin requiring biometric identification of all of its users beginning in April 2019.

Spear phishing will become even more targeted.

Cyber criminals understand that the more information they have about a potential victim, the more effectively they can design spear phishing campaigns. Some attackers are already developing newer and more disturbing ways to enact their plans, including hacking into a victim’s email system, lurking and learning. They will then use what they learn to create incredibly realistic messages that appear to be from a trusted source. Security personnel must remain especially vigilant to protect against these sophisticated and costly attacks over the coming months.

Advanced cybersecurity training may become a requirement for the C-suite.

The training surrounding cybersecurity will continue to advance and mature. As such, certifications may no longer be sufficient for a security professional to progress in his or her career – at least not at the upper management or C-suite level. This is supported by the growing number of degree programs that are devoted to cybersecurity. The companies of tomorrow looking to hire CSOs and CISOs will likely require some type of higher education as it relates to infosec.

What about you? Do you have any bold predictions about what the future has in store for cybersecurity? Tell us your thoughts in the comments section below!

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Ransomware is on the rise. Here’s how to recover from an attack.

Ransomware is on the rise. Here's how to recover from an attack.According to a recent survey, nearly 50% of all organizations have been struck by some type of ransomware in the last 12 months. Furthermore, CNN reports that $209 million was paid to ransomware hackers in just the first quarter of last year. If you think you won’t become a victim, think again. Even if you have a strong cybersecurity incident response strategy in place, it’s just as important to know what to do in the event that a threat slips by undetected.

If you find you’ve been hit by a ransomware attack, here’s what you need to do to mitigate damages and get things back on track as quickly as possible.

Step 1: Avoid clicking on anything unfamiliar.

It’s not uncommon for hackers to use pop up messages in an attempt to entice users into their trap. For instance, a dialog box might pop up containing a message that indicates your computer has been infected and instructing you to take certain steps to rectify the problem. Unfortunately, doing so will only make matters worse. Avoid clicking on anything that’s unfamiliar or even the slightest bit suspicious.

Step 2: Disconnect from the network.

The ultimate danger of ransomware is that it is designed to spread through the network as quickly and invasively as possible. To mitigate damages, you must take the appropriate measures to thwart the malware’s infiltration. As soon as you believe you’ve been infected, immediately disconnect your device from the network. If you are accessing the internet via WiFi, turn it off. If you are connected via an Ethernet cable, unplug it right away. The more quickly you cut off access to your network, the less havoc the hackers will be able to wreak.

Step 3: Save and troubleshoot.

As soon as you’ve disconnected from the network, the next step is to save any and all important documents or files you’ve been working on. Then, reboot your computer in safe mode. Once you’ve rebooted, run a virus scan. Hopefully your cybersecurity incident response strategy includes adequate virus protection that’s designed to both detect and eradicate any identified malware. In the absence of this type of security software, you may need to use another device to download the software, save it onto a flash drive and then run it on the infected device accordingly.

Step 4: Restore your system.

If your anti-virus software doesn’t do the trick, you may need to restore your system back to a previous period, prior to the ransomware infection. Provided this feature was never manually disabled, running a system restore from safe mode should be pretty easy and straightforward. To begin, simply choose Advanced Boot Options and then select Repair Your Computer. From there you should see an option for System Restore. Launching this will result in your device restarting in an older version.

Step 5: Examine your files.

The next step will depend on the type of ransomware that has infected your device. If you can’t locate your files (or the shortcut icons for them), that means they’ve either been hidden or they’ve been encrypted. To determine what type of mess you’re dealing with, start by finding your hidden files. Open your File Explorer and choose Computer (or This PC). Click the View tab and choose Hidden Items. If a list appears here, you should be able to restore your files easily by simply right-clicking each item, choosing Properties and unchecking “Hidden.”

If your files do not appear in the Hidden area of your computer, this unfortunately means your data has likely been encrypted. That means the hackers were able to lock up your data and they will only release what they’re holding “hostage” if you agree to pay their proposed fee (hence the term “ransomware”). This is why a cybersecurity incident response strategy that includes frequently backing up data to the cloud or external resources is so critically important.

Step 6: Don’t let it happen again!

If you’ve been unlucky enough to have been hit by ransomware, you’re not alone. Aside from being a huge headache and possibly costing your organization a good deal of money, this unfortunate event should serve as a lesson in how important it is to take proactive measures that will improve your level of protection against such attacks.

Start with a highly effective monitoring system, and then leverage tools like automated cybersecurity incident response to establish a closed-loop process. And, above all else, educate your employees on how to properly back up files and recognize the signs of potential malware. Taking the steps to prevent as well as being prepared to remediate an attack is key.

Is your organization as safe as it could be from costly ransomware attacks? Fortify your defense with our automation and orchestration platform, designed to pinpoint, isolate and destroy all types of cybersecurity incidents – including ransomware. Try it for yourself today.

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Why Automation is a Must for Cybersecurity

Why Automation is a Must for CybersecurityThe increasing complexity and sophistication of cyber threats today has far outpaced the ability for most conventional security strategies to keep up. Adding more security devices, as many IT teams have been doing to this point, simply isn’t enough to keep their networks safe. Billions of dollars have been spent taking this approach, yet countless organizations have continued to fall victim to savvy cyber-criminals. The good news is, there’s a solution that’s less expensive and far more effective: automation.

A particularly telling statistic is that 90% of all organizations are attacked on vulnerabilities that are several years old. Furthermore, 60% of those attacks target vulnerabilities that are a decade old or older. One of the biggest reasons these existing vulnerabilities remain is because companies are often afraid that patching or replacing apps and devices will disrupt critical processes and services that depend on them. Being offline even for a short amount of time can result in lost revenue.

For devices that are deemed too critical to be taken offline, network segmentation should be implemented so that in case of compromise, the impact will be restricted only to a small segment and not the entire network. Furthermore, redundancies must be in place to enable traffic to flow around it during an update. Lastly, automation should be leveraged to help identify any and all exposed devices within your network.

Another tactic that has made it possible for cyber-attackers to be so successful is their ability to hide inside networks for long periods of time and then go virtually undetected by mimicking normal network traffic and behavior. This is where intelligent automation can really make an impact. Automated platforms powered by AI and machine learning can continuously collect and analyze network data, identifying anomalies and addressing threats far faster than any human security professional could.

Cybercriminals are already using automation as a way to scale their attacks, making them more effective and reducing the amount of hand-holding required in traditional attacks. What’s more, threats are evolving far more quickly than security personnel can keep up with. In order to compete, organizations must effectively fight fire with fire. This is why automation has become a critical component of a robust, multi-faceted and equally sophisticated defense. Intelligent automation is capable of covering an entire network, identifying new and existing threats and making decisions on its own to mitigate them.

In order to accomplish this, the security infrastructure may require retooling. Isolated security platforms and devices must be replaced with a system that is fully integrated and interconnected. Traditional security tools (those that are still relevant, that is), such as firewalls, secure gateways and intrusion prevention systems, must be combined with advanced cybersecurity tools like intelligent automation. Once a threat is detected, a coordinated response and remediation can then be automatically initiated, thereby mitigating risk.

Most importantly, all of this must happen instantly, automatically and simultaneously across the entire network, including physical and virtual environments, remote offices, distributed data centers, mobile and IoT endpoint devices and deep into the cloud.

Simply put, the future of cybersecurity is cohesive systems powered by automated processes that utilize artificial intelligence to enable autonomous decision-making. Only organizations that adopt such an approach will survive the ever-evolving threat landscape.

Will your company be among them? Don’t get left behind. Get started on the right path by launching your free product demo today.

One of your biggest risk is insider threats. Here’s how to manage them.

One of your biggest risks is insider threats. Here's how to manage them.When we talk about security threats to the enterprise, the focus often centers on hackers and other external parties. In reality, the biggest danger to most organizations is the very users who work within. In fact, according to Gartner, more than 70% of unauthorized access to sensitive data is committed by a company’s own employees. The good news is enough research has been done to identify the five most common insider threats and, more importantly, what your organization can do to prevent and protect against them. Let’s take a look.

Problem: Sensitive Data Sharing via Email or IM

Along with the convenience of quick and/or instant electronic communications also comes the greater risk of confidential information being shared via one of these tools, like email or instant messaging. Thankfully, this is one of the easiest insider threats to manage and control.

Solution: Encrypt, Analyze and Filter

The easiest way to prevent sensitive data from being shared electronically is to ensure that all messages and the content contained within (including attachments) are properly encrypted. Additionally, you can set up a network analyzer and content filtering which will help to automatically identify and block any classified information from going out. Lastly, outsourced or perimeter-based messaging solutions often provide easy to manage content filtering and blocking, so know and take advantage of what’s available to you.

Problem: Remote Access Exploitation

One of the greatest benefits of today’s technology is the flexibility it affords to be able to access networks and internal systems from anywhere. Unfortunately, this same advancement can also prevent a whole new set of risks to the integrity and security of sensitive data. The ability to access information from off-site via remote access software can make it easier and more tempting to steal and compromise that data. Furthermore, inadequately protected remote devices could end up in the wrong hands if they become lost or stolen.

Solution: Establish Stronger Remote Work Guidelines

Controlling who can access and share files and keeping a close watch on OS and application logins is critical. Implementing tighter security controls, particularly those systems that are most sensitive and therefore pose the greatest risk can provide a much greater degree of protection. Likewise, monitoring and limiting employee usage through logs and audit trails will also add another layer of security. Finally, establishing stronger password requirements, using multi-factor authentication and enabling screen saver timeouts can prevent unauthorized access issues.

Problem: Peer-to-Peer File Sharing

P2P sharing software is a great tool for fostering collaboration and improving efficiency amongst employees, but these platforms also pose a significant security risk. All it takes is one ill-intentioned individual to misconfigure the software and suddenly your internal network and drives are available for anyone to access.

Solution: Implement More Stringent P2P Policies

The best way to prevent against P2P software vulnerabilities is to not allow it within your organization. Implementing a network analyzer and routinely performing firewall audits will further strengthen your defense. For optimum protection, a P2P firewall is recommended. If you do happen to allow P2P software, a perimeter-based content monitoring solution can help keep sensitive information secure.

Problem: Insecure Wireless Network Usage

Accessing confidential data via unsecured wireless networks can potentially place your organization at risk, even if that insider threat is unintentional. If your employees work remotely and use WiFi or Bluetooth connections, all it takes is one breach of a file transfer or email communication for your valuable data to be compromised.

Solution: Provide a Safer Alternative

Rather than allowing employees to utilize airwaves that are not adequately secure, providing your WiFi users with a secure wireless hotspot is the ideal solution. Use a VPN  for remote connectivity and implement a personal firewall for an added layer of protection. Don’t forget internal wireless networks, either. Always use encryption, authentication and logging. If Bluetooth is not necessary, disable it or, at the very least, make your devices undiscoverable.

Problem: Participating in Discussions on External Boards or Blogs

Whether it’s posting a question on a message board for support purposes or commenting on a thought-provoking blog, employees could inadvertently put your sensitive information at risk without even realizing it.

Solution: Filter and monitor.

Filtering content at the network perimeter is the most effective way to identify and block sensitive data from being shared externally. Of course, as with everything else, there’s always a chance that encrypted transmissions could be missed and may end up on such sites. For best results, setting up a notification system, such as Google Alerts, which will let you know any time certain keywords (specified by you) are used on the web.

Ultimately, managing insider threats should be an important component of your overall cyber security incident response strategy. Implementing tools like automation can help further identify, address and remediate security incidents – including those caused by internal parties – so that damages can be mitigated.

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

4 Cybersecurity Trends that Will Plague Businesses in 2018

4 Cybersecurity Trends that Will Plague Businesses in 2018We’re nearly one full month into 2018 and it’s clear already that cybersecurity remains one of the top priorities for businesses across the globe. Preparing in advance and having an idea of what to expect can help strengthen your defense. To help, we’ve identified a few of the top global security threats that experts believe have the potential to become significant obstacles for businesses over the coming months.

The IoT

The Internet of Things continues to add several new layers of risk to organizations across the globe. Unfortunately, the majority of IoT devices are not inherently secure, so as more companies adopt those IoT devices, they are unwittingly adding more vulnerability to their network and infrastructure. Additionally, there remains a lack of transparency surrounding what information is being captured and transmitted. When a cybersecurity breach does occur and the truth comes out, companies will likely be held responsible by both customers and regulators.

Crime as a Service (CaaS)

Criminal syndicates in the cyber realm are nothing new. What’s predicted to be different in 2018, however, is that thanks to CaaS, less sophisticated “aspirant” cyber-attackers (even those without a great amount of technical knowledge) will be able to purchase tools and services that will enable them to carry out attacks that they would otherwise been incapable of conducting on their own. Essentially, anyone who wishes to get into the cybersecurity game will have much easier entry moving forward, which means even more risk for businesses, particularly small to mid-sized ones.

Supply Chain

The supply chain is inherently vulnerable for a number of reasons; namely due to the fact that a good deal of sensitive and valuable information is typically shared amongst suppliers. As that data is shared, it results in a loss of control, which increases the risk of compromise in integrity, confidentiality and availability. The challenge lies in knowing precisely where information is at every stage of the lifecycle so it can be adequately protected. To address this, organizations must prioritize finding the weakest places in their supply chains so they can properly address those vulnerabilities before a problem arises.

Regulation

With the European Union General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) set to take effect within the next few months, a whole new layer of complexity will be added to critical asset management. GDPR isn’t just about compliance. It’s about being able to pinpoint any area throughout your organization and along your supply chain and understand how personal data is being managed and protected. If you’re not yet prepared for this upcoming deadline, here are a few guidelines to get you started.

These are, of course, just a few of the many cybersecurity threats that exist in the landscape today. The key to overcoming these threats is to implement a strong strategy that focuses not only on prevention, but also rapid detection and remediation.

Ayehu’s Next Generation Automation and Orchestration platform seamlessly integrates with all the top monitoring and incident response programs to become a cybersecurity force multiplier. Faster response means less impact on your company’s bottom line. Take it for a test drive today to learn more!

eBook: 5 Reasons You Should Automate Cyber Security Incident Response

Here’s What Cybersecurity Data Breaches Cost in 2017

Here’s What Cybersecurity Data Breaches Cost in 2017Welcome to 2018! As we usher in a new year, it can be helpful to take a look back at what occurred over the past 12 months, particularly in terms of cybersecurity. Recognizing what threats are out there and having an accurate understanding of what those risks could potentially cost your business can help you better prepare for and prevent such events from impacting your organization in the future. To gain some insight in this area, we turned to the 2017 Cost of Data Breach Study. Here’s a synopsis of what the study uncovered.

The annual study was conducted by IBM Security and Ponemon Institute, polling 63 U.S. organizations covering 16 different industry sectors. At a glance, the numbers look like the following:

  • Average number of breached records: 28,512
  • Average total cost of data breach: $7.35 million (up from $7.01 million)
  • Increase in total cost of data breach: 5%
  • Average cost per lost or stolen record: $225 (up from $221)
  • Increase in cost per lost or stolen record: 2%

How is the cost of a data breach calculated?

One of the biggest takeaways from this year’s study was the various factors that are used to calculate the cost of a data breach. Some are obvious, others are more obtuse. Here’s what organizations should take into consideration when evaluating risk:

  • Size of breach and/or number of records lost or stolen
  • Time required to identify and contain a breach (this number decreasing, thanks in large part to organizations investing in intelligent cybersecurity technologies)
  • Detection and escalation costs (including costs associated with investigations, assessments, audits and communication management)
  • Post-breach costs, including the expense of notifying victims and appropriate authorities as well as legal expenditures
  • Churn rate (loss of customers due to reputational damage following a data breach)

Some of the factors that are recommended for reducing these costs include the use of cybersecurity analytics as well as recruiting and retaining experienced, knowledgeable personnel. Implementing strategies and advanced technologies that can limit the number of records lost or stolen can also help organizations lower costs and mitigate risks.

Additional Noteworthy Findings

Narrowing down the 23-page report, here are a few of the most pertinent findings:

  • Both the individual and total average cost of data breaches for an organization have reached record highs
  • The amount of abnormal churn (i.e. loss of customers outside of normal course of business) is also on the rise
  • Heavily regulated industries experience higher data breach costs (particularly health care and financial services)
  • Detection and escalation costs are at a record high
  • Malicious or criminal attacks remain the primary cause of data breach (and the most costly)
  • Extensive use of mobile platforms has increased cybersecurity risk
  • Costs associated with lost business continue to increase
  • The use of intelligent cybersecurity analytics reduces the per capita cost of a breach

More money is being spent on indirect cybersecurity costs than direct ones. These costs include the time employees spend on notifications of data breaches as well as incident investigations/remediation efforts.

And, a point that’s so important it’s worth mentioning again: the time it takes to identify and contain a data breach has a tremendous impact on the costs associated with such breaches. In this year’s study, it took an average of 206 days for organizations to detect an incident and another 55 days to contain it. For mean time to identify (MTTI) of fewer than 100 days, the average cost associated was $5.99 million. For MTTI greater than 100 days, however, that cost increases significantly to $8.70 million. Likewise, costs associated with mean time to contain (MTTC) rose from $5.87 million (less than 30 days) to $8.83 million (30 days or more).

The overall conclusion from these facts and figures is that cybersecurity continues to be an incredibly costly risk to organizations. To mitigate this risk (and the hefty costs associated with it), business leaders must take a proactive approach, developing strategies and leveraging advanced incident response technology to stay a step ahead of hackers. Intelligent automation powered by AI and machine learning can provide this level of security.

To see the Ayehu platform in action and prepare your company for an uncertain future, click here.

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4 Cybersecurity Challenges that Could Be Placing Your Infrastructure at Risk

In today’s digital age, network availability and reliability are critical to businesses of every size and industry. A strong, secure infrastructure is the key to keeping customers happy, protecting your brand reputation and ensuring positive movement in terms of both revenue and profits. Achieving this type of maximum security, however, is becoming increasingly challenging in the face of escalating cyber-attacks.

Losing network access is no longer just a minor inconvenience for today’s businesses. Not only can it be incredibly costly from a financial standpoint, but it can also cause irreparable damage to a company’s reputation. And the cold, hard truth is, conventional methods for protection are no longer adequate, especially given the increase in frequency, intensity and size of cyber-attacks.

To achieve a secure infrastructure, IT leaders must address the four main challenges that are standing in their way. Those challenges are as follows.

Lack of Visibility

Maintaining a clear and accurate view of all devices and network assets across physical, virtual and cloud infrastructure is critical to maximum protection. After all, you can’t protect what you cannot see. The challenge lies in the reliance on traditional security systems to track and monitor the network. These antiquated solutions do not provide a complete view of all devices and assets, leaving some vulnerable to compromise.

To address this, IT leaders should leverage solutions that allow them to centralize and automate network discovery, enhance visibility and quickly identify attack points, anomalies, patterns and other suspicious activity.

Poor Vulnerability Detection

As challenging as it is to obtain a consolidated view of devices and network assets using conventional methods, spotting and quickly addressing vulnerabilities in those assets can be just as difficult.

Vulnerability scans can be helpful, but since they aren’t capable of continuously monitoring every single device, virtual machine and end point across complex infrastructures, nor can they pinpoint threats generated from configuration errors, non-compliant devices and outdated components, they simply aren’t sufficient enough to keep organizations secure.4 Cyber Security Challenges that Could Be Placing Your Infrastructure at Risk

Without comprehensive insight on vulnerabilities, networks are no match for the sophisticated cyber-attacks of today.

DNS-Based Attack Protection

Exploiting DNS has proven to be a highly effective way to disrupt and disable networks. Attackers utilize DNS pathways to ravage networks in a variety of ways. For instance, hackers often use DDos attacks to flood DNS servers with bogus requests, swap out legitimate URLS for fake ones that cause websites to appear to be down when they’re not, and create diversions that allow them to hide other types of attack.

The reason DNS has become the method of choice for so many cyber-criminals is because conventional infrastructure security methods are incapable of protecting DNS. To overcome this risk, IT leaders should seek out advanced solutions that are specifically designed and developed to comprehensively and automatically protect DNS from would-be attacks.

Lack of Integration within Security Ecosystem

Many companies employ the use of a large number of disparate security solutions from a variety of different vendors. This results in silos that are incapable of working together and sharing critical information, which results in a significant challenge to security teams who are responsible to take action amidst a dynamic and ever-evolving security landscape.

To complicate matters further, security teams in this situation also find themselves drowning in a sea of increasing threats with little to no clear direction on which threat to act upon first and why.

The solution is to create a network that is made up of systems, software and applications that can be fully integrated with one another with the goal of enhancing the performance of the entire cybersecurity ecosystem. This type of setup enables security teams to gain greater visibility and remediate swiftly to mitigate risk.

Conclusion

A failure to adequately protect your network and infrastructure can result in much more than just a little bit of downtime. A sophisticated and complex cyber-attack can cripple your network and place the reputation as well as the careers of everyone involved in jeopardy. To ensure maximum protection and network availability, organizations must close the gaps and address the vulnerabilities that other solutions create.

Integratable solutions which involve automation and data-driven intelligence can effectively improve visibility and enhance threat detection across even the most complex infrastructures, thwarting attacks and optimizing the performance of the entire security ecosystem.

Don’t get caught on the bad end of a cyber-threat. Provide your network and infrastructure with maximum protection. Launch your free product demo of Ayehu today to get started.

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Mitigating Damages with Automated Incident Response

Mitigate damages with automated incident response

2017 is coming to a close and if we’ve learned anything over the past 11 months, it’s that cyber-attackers are getting savvier and more relentless. Thankfully, we’ve also learned that having an automated incident response strategy could mean the difference between a mere blip on the radar and a potentially huge impact.

Here’s a recap of what the past year has taught us about cybersecurity.

Nobody is Immune

One of the most disturbing revelations from the growing cybersecurity events over the past year is the fact that not only did they impact tens of thousands of websites across the globe, but that many of those sites were among those people believe to be the most secure. For instance, a number of websites that were found to have been injected with the malicious script code, many were government sites as well as those ending in .edu. Prominent business sites were also among the targets of attacks. And, of course, we can’t forget small to mid-sized businesses that are also targets.

What this demonstrates is that nobody is 100% safe from a security threat. The key is having the right automated incident response plan in place to help identify threats as soon as they occur, before they have time to wreak havoc.

The Potential for Damages

While in some cases the attacks were rendered ineffective for one reason or another, that’s not to say that they’re not of significant concern. That’s because many attacks that occurred over the past year were launched as acts of reconnaissance in an attempt to learn more about users. The information gathered could very well be used in future attacks, which could include anything from SEO poisoning and the delivery of malware to compromised and unprotected users.

Automation = Mitigation

It’s important to point out that there is no way to totally prevent or completely avoid every potential attack that could occur. As criminals are becoming more sophisticated, their attempts are becoming equally complex. The best course of action is to develop and implement an automated incident response strategy that is comprehensive enough to help identify potential attacks immediately. Automation is critical to this process, as it allows round-the-clock surveillance and instant, automatic remediation.

By incorporating tools like IT process automation into your cybersecurity incident response plan, every single incident that could potentially be a threat is immediately identified and assessed behind the scenes (and without human intervention) to determine its validity and severity. The information gleaned from this evaluation is then used to determine the next steps in the process, whether it’s to execute a particular response automatically or to escalate the issue to be handled by the appropriate party.

Even though cyber-attacks cannot always be completely prevented, having a robust strategy in place allows for a more swift and effective response. This reduces the impact of an attack and subsequently allows for the mitigation of damages. For instance, instead of having to track back the cause of a system outage that has been allowed to perpetuate undetected for a long period of time (and a process that could take additional man hours, days, weeks or even months), automated incident response can quickly pinpoint the problem, helping you reduce downtime.

As we prepare to head into a new year, it’s important to ask yourself this question: does your security plan have what it takes to address the changing landscape of cybersecurity? Don’t become the next victim. Protect your business and your sensitive data by investing in automation. Take a test drive and experience it for yourself by clicking here.

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Two Key Ways Intelligent Automation is Changing the Face of Cybersecurity

Two Key Ways Intelligent Automation is Changing the Face of CybersecurityArtificial intelligence and machine learning technologies are being integrated into many aspects of our everyday lives. If you use Siri or Amazon Echo, you’ve already been touched by AI to some degree. One area where this so-called “smart” technology has become particularly valuable is in the realm of cybersecurity. But despite the buzz, it’s important to understand the real capabilities of intelligent automation in security.

Better Detection

Many are surprised to learn that artificial intelligence in cybersecurity isn’t a new concept. In fact, machine learning has been used to detect unwanted traffic for many years, including in such common tools as spam filters. So why all the hype today? Because that technology has continued to evolve and improve. Where it really shines today, specifically in terms of network security, is in its ability to pinpoint attacks that are outside the norm.

In other words, intelligent automation can detect a pattern or anomaly and recognize that something is suspicious entirely on its own. Not only is this incredibly effective, but it’s something human agents simply cannot do. That’s where an AI powered cybersecurity platform becomes what we like to call a force multiplier.

Volume Control

Another way intelligent automation is revolutionizing the way organizations handle their cybersecurity is in the sheer volume of threats. With the relentless onslaught of increasingly sophisticated attacks operating around the clock, even the most competent and diligent security team cannot keep up. AI technology, on the other hand, can handle an immense amount of data, continuously monitoring, instantly analyzing and immediately reacting to address potential incidents.

Again, like its intuitive ability to read patterns and detect anomalies, machine learning in cybersecurity can also become a force multiplier by augmenting human capability. This is particularly true in instances for which human decision making is still necessary. AI technology can monitor and assess enormous amounts of raw data looking for problems and pass them on to human analysts for closer examination. Furthermore, the interaction with humans allows the intelligent automation platform to continuously refine and improve its search algorithms (hence, the “learning” in machine learning).

When it boils down to it, the hype about AI and machine learning in security is turning out to be all that it’s cracked up to be. With the right platform, intelligent automation can bring your cybersecurity strategy to an entirely new level, providing enhanced protection and keeping your organization a few steps ahead of potential attacks.

To see this innovative technology in action, simply click here and request a free product demo.

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5 Cybersecurity Mistakes That Could Be Placing Your Company in Danger

5 Cybersecurity Mistakes That Could Be Placing Your Company in DangerWhen it comes to keeping your organization and all the data you maintain secure from potential breaches, you may believe you know the basics. You may even think you’ve got it all together, with all the right strategies, tools and technologies in place to ensure maximum protection. But there are a few mistakes that many companies make without even realizing they’re doing so. And the consequences of those errors could be incredibly costly, both financially and reputation-wise. If you or your cybersecurity team are committing any of the following blunders, your business could be at risk.

Being overconfident.

Some IT leaders make the egregious mistake of believing that cybersecurity isn’t really that much to be concerned about. For instance, some think that because they’re a small business, cyber criminals aren’t interested in the information they possess. Others, such as end-users, believe that their IT team will handle everything. The fact is, cybersecurity is something companies of every size and all employees absolutely must account for. Otherwise, your firm will become a sitting target.

Neglecting the power of email.

Many companies invest tons of money, time and resources into protecting their network and infrastructure, yet somehow forget to secure email communications. The fact is, email remains one of the most effective tools used by cyber criminals to gain access to the sensitive data they’re after and if you’re not using the right kind of protection – namely two-step verification and encryption – you’re placing your company at risk. It’s equally important to educate all users about how to spot phishing and other social engineering attempts.

Inadequate password policies.

Weak passwords are a hacker’s dream come true. Despite this fact, it’s alarming how many people still use passwords like ‘12345’ or ‘admin’. Not only do people use these easy-to-guess passwords, but they often reuse them on multiple systems, making it simple for a cyber-criminal to gain access to any number of systems and applications. This is a huge problem for companies that must be addressed through the development and implementation of strong password policies.

Thinking anti-virus is enough.

Many otherwise savvy individuals make the costly error of believing that anti-virus software is enough to keep their sensitive data secure. The fact is, today’s hackers are becoming more sophisticated and persistent by the day, which means they’re identifying newer vulnerabilities to exploit – vulnerabilities that cannot be detected with traditional malware prevention methods. To truly be safe, the use of automated cybersecurity incident response powered by machine learning is strongly recommended.

Not backing up data.

The fact is, even the strongest cybersecurity strategy can be infiltrated by a dedicated enough hacker. It’s no longer a question of IF you’ll be attacked, but rather WHEN. As such, engaging in regular data backup activities can ensure that should your infrastructure be compromised, you can get back up and running quickly and with minimal impact. For instance, when your data is backed up, a ransomware attack can be neutralized since there will be no need to pay the fee in order to regain access to files. Instead, the infected files can be isolated and eradicated and data restored from your backup.

These five cybersecurity mistakes are surprisingly common. Thankfully, correcting them isn’t impossible. If you recognize any of the above occurring within your organization, the time to take action is now. Start by implementing the right policies, educating employees and investing in the right technology to keep your information as secure as possible.

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