Why Your SOC and NOC Should Run Together

Why Your SOC and NOC Should Run Together but Separately

The similarities between the role of the Network Operation Center (NOC) and Security Operation Center (SOC) often lead to the mistaken idea that one can easily handle the other’s duties. Furthermore, once a company’s security information and event management system is in place, it can seem pointless to spend money on a SOC. So why can’t the NOC just handle both functions? Why should each work separately but in conjunction with one another? Let’s take a look a few reasons below.

First, their roles are subtly but fundamentally different. While it’s certainly true that both groups are responsible for identifying, investigating, prioritizing and escalating/resolving issues, the types of issues and the impact they have are considerably different. Specifically, the NOC is responsible for handling incidents that affect performance or availability while the SOC handles those incidents that affect the security of information assets. The goal of each is to manage risk, however, the way they accomplish this goal is markedly different.

The NOC’s job is to meet service level agreements (SLAs) and manage incidents in a way that reduces downtime – in other words, a focus on availability and performance. The SOC is measured on their ability to protect intellectual property and sensitive customer data – a focus on security. While both of these things are critically important to the success of an organization, having one handle the other’s duties can spell disaster, mainly because their approaches are so different.

Another reason the NOC and SOC should not be combined is because the skillset required for members of each group is vastly different. A NOC analyst must be proficient in network, application and systems engineering, while SOC analysts require security engineering skills. Furthermore, the very nature of the adversaries that each group battles differs, with the SOC focusing on “intelligent adversaries” and the NOC dealing with naturally occurring system events. These completely different directions result in contrasting solutions which can be extremely difficult for each group to adapt to.

Lastly, the turnover rate in a SOC is much higher than that of a NOC. Perhaps it’s the very nature of the role, but the average employment time for a level 1 SOC analyst is around 2 years or less. Tenure of a NOC analyst is much longer. It only stands to reason, then, that asking a NOC analyst to handle their own duties and also take on those of SOC will likely result in a much higher attrition rate overall.

The best solution is to respect the subtle yet fundamental differences between these two groups and leverage a quality automation product to link the two, allowing them to collaborate for optimum results. The ideal system is one where the NOC has access to the SIEM, so they can work in close collaboration with the SOC and each can complement the other’s duties. The SOC identifies and analyzes issues, then recommends fixes to the NOC, who analyzes the impact those fixes will have on the organization and then modifies and implements accordingly.





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